batten down the hatches, to

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Related to To batten down the hatches: bailiwick

batten down the hatches

To prepare for a challenging situation. While this originated as a nautical phrase, it is now used for any sort of imminent problem. There's a tornado coming—batten down the hatches! My mother-in-law is coming to town this weekend, so I better batten down the hatches.
See also: batten, down, hatch

batten down the hatches

Fig. to prepare for difficult times. (From a nautical expression meaning, literally, to seal the hatches against the arrival of a storm. The word order is fixed.) Here comes that contentious Mrs. Jones. Batten down the hatches! Batten down the hatches, Congress is in session again.
See also: batten, down, hatch

batten down the hatches

Prepare for trouble, as in Here comes the boss-batten down the hatches. This term originated in the navy, where it signified preparing for a storm by fastening down canvas over doorways and hatches (openings) with strips of wood called battens. [Late 1800s]
See also: batten, down, hatch

batten down the hatches

If you batten down the hatches, you prepare for a difficult situation by doing everything you can to protect yourself. While most companies are battening down the hatches, fearing recession, Blenheim is leading an assault on the US market. Banks seem to be battening down the hatches in anticipation of further trouble. Note: Battens are strips of wood used for fastening things down. Hatches are openings in the deck of a ship, or the wooden flaps which cover the openings.
See also: batten, down, hatch

batten down the hatches

prepare for a difficulty or crisis.
Batten down the hatches was originally a nautical term meaning ‘make a ship's hatches secure with gratings and tarpaulins’ in expectation of stormy weather.
1998 Oldie They endured the hard pounding of the Seventies, when Labour battened down the hatches, and soldiered through the follies of the early Eighties.
See also: batten, down, hatch

ˌbatten down the ˈhatches

prepare yourself for a period of difficulty or trouble: Hollywood is battening down the hatches in expectation of a strike by actors and writers this summer.A batten is a long piece of wood which was used to hold down strong material in order to cover a ship’s hatches (= openings in the deck of a boat leading to the lower level) in a storm.
See also: batten, down, hatch

batten down the hatches

To prepare for an imminent disaster or emergency.
See also: batten, down, hatch

batten down the hatches, to

To get ready for trouble. A nautical term dating from the early nineteenth century, it signified preparing for bad weather by fastening down the battens, strips of wood nailed to various parts of masts and spars, and fastening tarpaulins over the ship’s hatchways (doorways and other openings). The term began to be used figuratively as preparing for any emergency by the late nineteenth century. See also clear the decks.
See also: batten, down
References in periodicals archive ?
So, time to batten down the hatches ahead of the inevitable recession?
Senior Environment portfolio leader Gareth Roberts, said: "We are all encouraged to batten down the hatches at home and make sure our houses don't leak energy and use energy efficient devices such as light bulbs.
EIGHT LEGGED FREAKS ITV1 Wales, Monday, 10.35pm The residents of an Arizona town are forced to batten down the hatches and reach for the flame-throwers when mutant spiders are created by a toxic waste spill but the rampaging arachnids have 11'ed an insatiable appetite for human flesh.
But there is no need to batten down the hatches as the storm is expected to lose its power over the ocean.
"They will probably throw everything at us in the first half, and we will probably have to batten down the hatches.
Just as it was recovering from the freak tornado which ravaged parts of Kings Heath, Balsall Heath and Spark-brook last July, it is now being told to batten down the hatches in preparation for more storms ahead.
Politicians are on a warning to batten down the hatches as Rory Bremner and collaborators John Bird and John Fortune return with biting humour and impersonations in the new series of Bremner, Bird and Fortune (Tonight, Channel 4, 8pm).
An hour's lead time is enough to batten down the hatches of a satellite or alert a power company that may need to rely on reserves and minimize use of long-distance transmission lines.
BRITAIN was told to batten down the hatches yesterday as it faced the backlash of America's Hurricane Floyd.
Instead of rain the show was hit by high winds, with tradestands warned the night before to batten down the hatches.
Personally I've no specific issue with bonfires, marches or anything else associated with the traditional 12th July celebrations (and if I did, I doubt this is the place to bring them up!) but it's good to see that the average bar in Belfast - and the rest of the country - no longer feels the need to batten down the hatches.
But there's no need to batten down the hatches yet or find the shovel for the drive.
HUDDERSFIELD was warned to batten down the hatches today.
Show me any natural disaster in history that was averted because the Michael Fishes of this world told you to batten down the hatches. Though, I don't believe he did, of course.
Having gone to the North Carolina coastal community of Rodanthe to look after an inn belonging to friend Jean (Viola Davis), a storm means Adrienne Willis (Lane) will need to batten down the hatches.