time out

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time out

1. noun A brief pause, break, or hiatus from something. I wish I had taken time out before starting this job—that might have kept me from getting burned out so quickly, Take time out for lunch. Work will still be here when you get back.
2. noun In sports, an official break in play allotted to each team. Sometimes hyphenated. They had better take a time-out here to set up a play. They burned their time-outs earlier in the half, so they have none remaining.
3. noun A punishment for young children who have misbehaved that consists of secluding them from activities and other people for a brief period of time. Sometimes hyphenated. If you keep throwing your toys like that, I'm going to give you a time out! I think he might need a time-out.
4. verb To cease or suspend operation, especially after being idle for a certain period of time. The demo of the video game will time out after 15 minutes. To save power and reduce the risk of harming the display, computer monitors are set to time out after 20 minutes of inactivity.
5. interjection Stop the clock. Said during sporting events. Time out, ref! One of our guys is injured.
6. interjection By extension, stop talking or doing what you're doing. OK, wait, time out—you didn't tell me that you and Tom were dating again! Time out! We are not driving this car another foot if you are going to keep acting like this!
See also: out, time

time someone out

to record someone's departure time. Harry had to time everyone out because the time clock was broken. I had to time out everyone.
See also: out, time

time out

 
1. to record one's departure time. Did you remember to time out when you left work? I timed out at the regular time.
2. a call for officially stopping the clock in a game. Time out! Wally is injured!
See also: out, time

time out

A short break from work or play; also, a punishment for misbehavior in young children in which they are briefly separated from the group. For example, People rush around so much these days that I think everyone should take some time out now and then , or We don't throw food, Brian; you need some time out to think about it. This expression comes from a number of sports in which it signifies an interruption in play where the officials stop the clock, for purposes of rest, making a substitution, or consultation. Its figurative use dates from the mid-1900s.
See also: out, time

time out

v.
Computer Science To cease functioning after a period of idle time has elapsed: The server connection times out after 15 minutes.
See also: out, time

Time (out)!

exclam. Stop talking for a minute! (A way of interrupting someone.) Just a minute! Time out! I want to speak!
See also: time

Time !

verb
References in periodicals archive ?
He was probably expecting a timeout in that situation.
We took [their] timeout. We were able to gather ourselves, draw up a play.
However, when it comes to timeout, child behavior specialists have failed to reach consensus.
One coach said removing the player's timeout takes away a critical element in strategy and tactics in the PBA.
Failing to code COMMITs in a data modification program can cause lock timeouts for other concurrent tasks.
It represents a saving of 26.4 percent compared to Scenario 3-b (with the 20-minute timeout), reflective of the latest energy code provisions.
Both Sharapova and Ivanovic are through the first round of the Open, and the statements that the Russian has made about penalizing medical timeouts have reached Ivanovic.
(iii) Immediate Retransmission Timeout Recovery (IRTOR): It helps to guide the TCP sender to adjust the sending rate upon the expiration of retransmission timeouts caused by transmission errors.
Next, the 28 timeouts taken after three or more successive serves were examined for frequency of decreased velocity and lengthened duration of time to complete the serve.
It had a very dim light." In an administrative appeal to a hearing officer, she also complained of "inappropriate reliance upon timeouts and physical restraints." Defeated there, she complained to the district court under section 1983 of the U.S.
Companies must consider what educational programs best support their objectives, when they should take timeouts for training and when it's time to get back into the game.
They were denied in their bid by the officials and lost a timeout.
Has the coaching staff practiced late-game timeouts with just the coaching staff?
To date, inclusion timeouts have been the most extensively researched form of timeout.
Both groups of teachers also gave fewer timeouts, criticized the children less often, and rated their classes as more manageable from pre- to post-treatment.