the salt of the earth


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the salt of the earth

A person or group that is regarded as genuine, unpretentious, and morally sound. This phrase is typically complimentary. Don't worry, even with all his success, Robert is still the salt of the earth. He donates most of his salary to charity and volunteers weekly at the hospital.
See also: earth, of, salt

salt of the earth

Fig. the most worthy of people; a very good or worthy person. (A biblical reference, Matthew 5:13.) Mrs. Jones is the salt of the earth. She is the first to help anyone in trouble. Frank's mother is the salt of the earth. She has five children of her own and yet fosters three others.
See also: earth, of, salt

salt of the earth, the

The best or noblest of their kind, as in These campers are the salt of the earth. This metaphoric term was used by Jesus for those who were persecuted for being loyal to him (Matthew 5:13) and has been repeated ever since.
See also: of, salt

the salt of the earth

If you describe someone as the salt of the earth, you mean that they are ordinary, honest and reliable and good. Previously, footballers were seen as working-class heroes, the salt of the earth. She's very good-hearted, the salt of the earth — as Liverpool people are. Note: Salt-of-the-earth can be used before a noun. Most of the people there are salt-of-the-earth, good, working-class people striving to improve themselves. Note: This comes from the Bible, when Jesus is talking to His disciples: `Ye are the salt of the earth: but if the salt have lost his savour, wherewith shall it be salted?' (Matthew 5:13)
See also: earth, of, salt

the salt of the earth

a person or group of people of great kindness, reliability, or honesty.
This phrase comes from Matthew 5:13: ‘Ye are the salt of the earth: but if the salt have lost his savour, wherewith shall it be salted?’
See also: earth, of, salt

the salt of the ˈearth

a very good and honest person that you can always depend on: Tim’s the salt of the earth — he’d do anything he can for you. OPPOSITE: the scum of the earthThis expression comes from the Bible.
See also: earth, of, salt

salt of the earth

1. A person or group considered as embodying simplicity and moral integrity.
2. Archaic A person or group considered the best or most worthy part of society.
See also: earth, of, salt
References in periodicals archive ?
Jesus' message, on the other hand, goes out to people who have hope, people who have not turned their backs on God, people who have not lost their saltiness but instead are the salt of the earth.
Phil Drabble and all people like him are the salt of the earth and backbone of our nation.
Jesus said to His disciples: "You are the salt of the earth.
SIR - It might make good copy on the day before a rugby international, but is the comparison between the upper-class public school English rugby player and the salt of the earth working class Welsh player correct ("When Wales take to the pitch to face the old enemy tomorrow, being a different class to their English counterparts is not just what they hope to be, it's mostly what they are" Feb 24)?
The Salt of the Earth charity says their Social Change and Development (SCAD) partners in India can plant one new sapling for every 50p donation.
The majority of youngsters are the salt of the earth - we should praise them more and condemn them less.
I am a local lad and I am fond of the people of this area - they are the salt of the earth.
Then maybe they'll see we're not all coughing up nutty slack from generations of heavy industry, that fried Mars bars are not on everyone's menu, and that Coatbridge folk - and Lanarkshire people in general - are the salt of the earth.
Participants joined in the song's refrain: "The light of the world/ The salt of the earth,/ We scatter the darkness/ When love becomes our way.
When I was brought up in Birmingham, folk were the salt of the earth who would help you with your problems.
Tell the kids to ask their parents about the 70s and 80s - what happened to the salt of the earth (the miners).
In his autobiography The Salt of the Earth (1997) the Cardinal criticized the manner of the post Vatican Council changeover as having done "extremely serious damage" to the Church, especially by the abrupt break in the theology of the Mass which often was not carried over into the new liturgy with its tendentious and inaccurate translations from the Latin.