that is

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that is

In other words; or, to clarify or explain more clearly. No, I have never met him—not formally, that is. I'll be there this afternoon. That is, after about four o'clock or so. Yep, we planned to drive together. That is, if you still want to go.
See also: that

that is

Also, that is to say. To explain more clearly, in other words, as in It's on the first floor, that is, at street level, or We're coming next month, that is to say, in November. [Early 1600s] Also see under that's.
See also: that

that is (to say)


1 in other words: I’m between jobs at the moment; that’s to say unemployed.It cost him a week’s wages, that is, €300.
2 used to give more information or to correct what has already been said: She’s a housewife — when she’s not teaching English, that is.Let him explain it — if he can, that is.Nobody wants to do it. Nobody except me, that is.
See also: that

that is

To explain more clearly; in other words: on the first floor, that is, the floor at street level.
See also: that
References in classic literature ?
And that's jist the thruth of the rason why he wears his lift hand in a sling.
"Aye, aye; go that way of a dark night, that's all," said Mr.
That's what I say, and I've said it many a time; but there's nobody 'ull ventur a ten-pun' note on their ghos'es as they make so sure of."
"Why, Dowlas, that's easy betting, that is," said Ben Winthrop.
"Yes, that's what every yapping cur is, when you hold a stick up at him," said the farrier.
Evidence that was no evidence, and that's what we have to prove.
The further you hide it the quicker you will find it, and if anything turns up, if I hear any rumours, I'll take it to the police.' Of course, that's all taradiddle; he lies like a horse, for I know this Dushkin, he is a pawnbroker and a receiver of stolen goods, and he did not cheat Nikolay out of a thirty-rouble trinket in order to give it to the police.
'So that's what you are up to!' 'Take me,' he says, 'to such-and-such a police officer; I'll confess everything.' Well, they took him to that police station-- that is here--with a suitable escort.
'What anxiety?' 'That I should be accused of it.' Well, that's the whole story.
If you wish to talk to me, you can come, that's all.
And I'll not deny neither but what some of my people was shook--maybe all was shook; maybe I was shook myself; maybe that's why I'm here for terms.
You would just as soon save your lives, I reckon; and that's yours.
It's a shame, a blamed shame, that's what it is." He shrugged his shoulders.
"Oh, that's good -- I tell you, Tom, I was most scared to death; I'd a bet anything it was a STRAY dog."
"Yes, an' that's what I come ter tell ye, so you WOULD know," asserted Jimmy, eagerly.