testament

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Related to Testaments: New Testaments

final will and testament

The final form of one's legal will, which dictates what is to be done with one's estate upon death. We were all shocked to find out that John had been left out of Dad's final will and testament. According to her final will and testament, half of her fortune is to be donated to charity.
See also: and, final, testament, will

last will and testament

The final form of one's legal will, which dictates what is to be done with one's estate upon death. We were all shocked to find out that John had been left out of Dad's last will and testament. According to her last will and testament, half of her fortune is to be donated to charity.
See also: and, last, testament, will

last will and testament

a will; the last edition of someone's will. The lawyer read Uncle Charles's last will and testament to a group of expectant relatives. Fred dictated his last will and testament on his deathbed.
See also: and, last, testament, will
References in periodicals archive ?
The early Anabaptists of the Netherlands and the northern German lands received the Old Testament and the Apocrypha more positively than the Anabaptists of Switzerland, south Germany, and Moravia/Hungary.
One comes from Ihor Sevcenko, who noted in 1974 that an anonymous quotation in the Testament comes from paragraph 21 of the work of the sixth-century Byzantine deacon Agapetus.
There is, in fact, a "third testament," the writings of Emanuel Swedenborg, (1) but others may say that the Glorious Qur'an is chronologically earlier than Swedenborg's writings, and, hence, the Qur'an deserves to be called the Third Testament.
[5] The director, screenwriter, and producer of the film, Matt Dallmann, told me that the film "is really just a 'what if' scenario if a third testament was presented in modern day with all of the political and religious spin in modern day media." He did not intend to push his own message, but rather leave it up to the viewers to reach their own interpretation.
Part I, entitled "From Theology to History," charts the history of the historical-critical paradigm in European and North American study of the Old Testament over the past two centuries.
The practicality gap between the New Testament and the Quran goes a long way toward explaining the theocracy gap between Western and Arab Muslim societies.
That a continuity of purpose related the message of the Old Testament to the Christian Church of the New provided him with all the justification he needed for directing his scholarly abilities toward seeking a fuller insight into this first part of the biblical canon.
Christian readers may find Boys' terminology jarring, with her use of neutral terms like First and Second Testament, and B.C.E.
Take the example of the pagan woman who came to Jesus and said, `My daughter is ill, please heal her.' Jesus said he could not: `One does not take the bread from the children's table and throw it to the dogs.' Here, in the New Testament, Jesus appears to be a racist who says that the Gospel is only for Jews.
Finally, one must ask what a thematic approach to biblical theology encompassing both Old and New Testaments does to the plurality of voices in scripture.
Bishop Tunstall turned to his friend Thomas More to produce a reply to Tyndale, and More produced a Dialogue Concerning Heresies--which brought an Answer to Sir Thomas More by Tyndale--which brought from More a sometimes hysterical work, Confutation of Tyndale, accusing his antagonist of discharging a "filthy foam of blasphemies out of his brutish beastly mouth." Bobrick calls More's "book review" of the New Testament translation perhaps the most wrongheaded ever penned.
In these ways the Eucharist will come to instantiate for us the figurative relationship between the Old and New Testaments in which Jesus is received not as the replacement or repudiation of Israel, but as the confirmation and salvation of an Israel now extended to the Gentiles.
Most of his book, Mary, is a scholarly delineation of her place in the salvation story as he finds evidence of it in the Old and New Testaments and in the teachings of some of the great church leaders.
He spends considerable effort in demonstrating the unity of 3:13-4:10 under the theme of envy, drawing connections to Hellenistic literature and especially the Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs, but I wonder if it is worth the effort.
As well as eight complete Bibles, the 1997 Scripture Language Report lists 31 new New Testaments, three of which are the first Scriptures to appear in those languages.