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call (oneself) a (something)

A phrase used to show the speaker's incredulity that someone considers themself to be a particular thing, often a friend. And you call yourself a friend? You totally gossiped about me to other people in our class! If she's only working as an intern there, how can she call herself an editor on her resume?
See also: call

experience is the best teacher

proverb Most wisdom is gained by experiencing different things (compared to acquiring knowledge through schooling or other means). A few years ago, I couldn't even get behind the wheel without having panic attacks, but, with practice, I'm much calmer and can drive with no problems. Experience is the best teacher after all.
See also: experience, teacher

experience is the teacher of fools

Foolish people only learn from personal experience, rather than witnessing others' mistakes. After watching Alex's failed attempt at the experiment, I realized what we were doing wrong. Experience is the teacher of fools.
See also: experience, fool, of, teacher

no (person) worth their salt would (do something)

No person who warrants respect in a certain field or profession would engage in such bad behavior or activity. No professor worth their salt would remove a student from class just for asking controversial questions. It's baffling—no doctor worth their salt would have missed such an obvious diagnosis.
See also: no, salt, worth

teacher's pet

1. A derogatory term for a teacher's favorite or favored student, typically one who has sought such favor by being ingratiatingly obedient. Jill's classmates called her a teacher's pet after she volunteered to supervise the class while the teacher was away. Being the teacher's pet will get you nowhere when the midterm exam rolls around.
2. By extension, a derogatory term for someone who has gained or attempts to gain the favor of an authority figure, typically in order to obtain preferential treatment. Jeff is the resident teacher's pet in the office. He brings the boss coffee every day.
See also: pet

wear (one's particular profession's) hat

To act as one would in one's particular profession while in a different setting. Bobby, I know you're off duty, but can you please wear your doctor's hat for five minutes and tell me what's wrong with my arm? I don't want to have to go to the hospital. My wife was still wearing her judge's hat when she tried to intervene with our neighbor's arguing kids.
See also: hat, particular, wear
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

Experience is the best teacher.

Prov. You will learn more from things that happen to you in real life than you will from hearing about or studying things that happen to other people. I don't care how many books you read about how to run a business; experience is the best teacher. The nurse believed that experience was the best teacher when it came to developing a bedside manner, so she made sure that all her students spent a lot of time with patients.
See also: experience, teacher

Experience is the teacher of fools.

Prov. Only fools do not learn after seeing other people's mistakes and insist on repeating them. Father: You should spend more time studying and less time having fun with your friends. If I had been a better student when I was your age, I'd have a better job now. Son: Oh, come on, Dad. School's worthless. Father: Don't make the same mistake I did! Experience is the teacher of fools.
See also: experience, fool, of, teacher

*teacher's pet

the teacher's favorite student. (*Typically: be ~; become ~.) Sally is the teacher's pet. She always gets special treatment. The other students don't like the teacher's pet.
See also: pet
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

teacher's pet

A person who has gained favor with authority, as in Al has managed to be teacher's pet in any job he has held. This expression transfers the original sense of a teacher's favorite pupil to broader use. [1920s]
See also: pet
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

no teacher/actor, etc. worth their salt

COMMON If you say, for example, that no teacher worth their salt or no actor worth their salt would do a particular thing, you mean that no teacher or actor who was good at their job would consider doing that thing. No racing driver worth his salt gets too sentimental about his cars. No player worth his salt wants to play in the lower divisions. Note: Instead of no, you can use any or every with this expression. For example, if you say that any teacher worth their salt would do a particular thing, you mean that any teacher who was good at their job would do that thing. Any policeman worth his salt would have made proper checks to find out exactly who this man was. Every teacher worth their salt will learn as much from their students as their students learn from them. Note: In the past, salt was expensive and rare. Roman soldiers were paid a `salarium' or salt money, so they could buy salt and stay healthy.
See also: no, salt, teacher, worth
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

call yourself a ˈteacher, ˈfriend, etc.?

(informal) used to say that you do not think somebody is a very good teacher, friend, etc: Call yourself a friend? Why did you forget my birthday then?How can he call himself a musician when he’s never even heard of Schubert?
See also: call
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

teacher's pet

Someone who seeks preferential treatment. A derisive epithet hurled at a student who tries to curry a teacher's favor in hopes of a better grade. Such a charge, valid or not, often led to cloakroom or schoolyard challenges and bloody noses. Outside of school, it was applied to people who insinuated themselves to authority in the hope of special treatment. The French equivalent is “teacher's little cabbage.”
See also: pet
Endangered Phrases by Steven D. Price Copyright © 2011 by Steven D. Price
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References in classic literature ?
The teachers were infinitely superior, for they had paid to go to school in their time, and were paid now.
Of course the teacher who had not said it, indicated the rival who had, whom Miss Monflathers frowningly requested to hold her peace; by that means throwing the informing teacher into raptures of joy.
The Protagoras arrived at a sort of hypothetical conclusion, that if 'virtue is knowledge, it can be taught.' In the Euthydemus, Socrates himself offered an example of the manner in which the true teacher may draw out the mind of youth; this was in contrast to the quibbling follies of the Sophists.
I was one of the last to go out, and in passing the tables, I saw one teacher take a basin of the porridge and taste it; she looked at the others; all their countenances expressed displeasure, and one of them, the stout one, whispered -
Miss Miller was now the only teacher in the room: a group of great girls standing about her spoke with serious and sullen gestures.
She was merry and cheerful, and showed much innocent playfulness in her intercourse with her teacher. Her delight on recognising a favourite playfellow and companion - herself a blind girl - who silently, and with an equal enjoyment of the coming surprise, took a seat beside her, was beautiful to witness.
I therefore put him in the hands of an intelligent teacher, nothing doubting of his rapid progress.'
God has appeared to me in the person of Kate Swift, the school teacher, kneeling naked on a bed.
"Mademoiselle," said she, looking up and addressing the teacher, "Will you have the goodness to go and stand in the corridor, while the young ladies are putting on their things, and try to keep some order?"
Featured teachers: Doris Fukawa with other SFCM faculty TBA.
Matching girls with female teachers and boys with male teachers is both impractical and undesirable.
Findings revealed positive perceptions of goal setting on classroom performance in the initial stages of learning as students perceived they achieved better academically when they set their own goals but they exerted less effort in achieving their own goals versus those set by their teachers.
The nation s teacher unions-the American Federation of Teachers and the National Education Association-agree that teacher quality needs to improve but believe Bush's ideas are off.
In this study, the purpose was to examine Kuwaiti special education teachers' attitudes toward autistic students in the Autism School in Kuwait.
So I wrote a column for the start of the 1995 school year, saying parents, administrators and others must be more supportive of teachers, or more teachers would leave the profession.
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