take it or leave it


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take it or leave it

1. Either accept something, especially an offer, as it is, or else reject it unconditionally. The car costs $5,000, take it or leave it. I'm making eggs for breakfast, so unless you want to fix something for yourself, you can take it or leave it.
2. To have mixed or weak feelings about something; to neither love nor hate something. A: "Did you like the new Chinese restaurant?" B: "I could take it or leave it, to be honest."
See also: leave, take
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

Take it or leave it.

Inf. Take this one or none; you have no choice. Bill: That's my final offer. Take it or leave it. Bob: Aw, come on! Take off a few bucks. Bill: Aw, I want eggs for breakfast, Mom. Mother: There's only cornflakes left. Take it or leave it.
See also: leave, take
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

take it or leave it

Accept or reject unconditionally, as in I'm asking $1,000 for this computer-take it or leave it. This term, used to indicate one's final offer, was first recorded in 1576.
See also: leave, take
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

take it or leave it

said to convey that the offer you have made is not negotiable and that you are indifferent to another's reaction to it.
See also: leave, take
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

take it or ˈleave it


1 used to say that you do not care if somebody accepts or rejects your offer: $200 is my final offer, take it or leave it.
2 (informal) (with can, not used in the negative) not feel strongly about something, not mind something: ‘Do you like Indian food?’ ‘I can take it or leave it.’
See also: leave, take
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

Take it or leave it

sent. There are no other choices.; It is this or nothing. This is what you get for the money. Take it or leave it.
See also: leave, take
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

take it or leave it

To accept or reject unconditionally.
See also: leave, take
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

take it or leave it

Accept or reject it, but make a decision, for this offer is final. This expression dates from the fourteenth century, and several versions appear in Shakespeare’s plays. The precise modern wording and sense are in Thomas Killigrew’s play Thomaso (1664, 1:4): “That is the price . . . take it or leave it.” A modern variant is I can take it (him/her) or leave it (him/her), meaning I don’t feel strongly one way or the other.
See also: leave, take
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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