tacky

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tacky

Cheap, crude, and unrefined; indicating or characteristic of a lack of class, elegance, or sophistication. He showed up in a really tacky suit. Their food is actually really good, I just think their decorations are a bit tacky.

ticky-tacky

1. noun Any cheap, shoddy material, especially used in construction. Judging from how little soundproofing there is in this building, I'd say they made the walls out of ticky-tacky.
2. adjective Consisting of or constructed from such cheap or shoddy materials. The company threw up a couple ticky-tacky bungalows so the crew could live on-site until the work was finished.
3. adjective Mediocre or unimaginative in design, appearance, or style. They've been building row after row of ticky-tacky houses about 20 minutes from the city off the interstate. They're so cookie-cutter in design that they're actually a little depressing to look at.
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

tacky

1. mod. cheap; crude. That was a tacky thing to do to her.
2. mod. alcohol intoxicated. Tom was a little tacky, so he gave me his car keys.

ticky-tacky

(ˈtɪkitæki)
n. cheap and shabby material. Those houses are just made of ticky-tacky, and they won’t even be here in twenty years.
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Tackies were used again during the Civil War, and after the conflict, they became an integral part of agricultural life in South Carolina and Georgia, particularly within the African American Gullah community.
Money couldn't buy a better hunting horse for the local terrain, and many dignitaries were known to have ridden Tackies. Architect Frank Lloyd Wright designed Auldbrass Plantation in South Carolina to include specially sized stables for the owner's Marsh Tacky hunting horses.
During World War II, Tackies were used as beach patrol mounts on the Southern coast to protect the shores from the threat of German U-boats and potential landings of enemy troops or spies.
Today, the majority of Tackies belong to hunters and long-time fanciers and breeders who've had these horses in their families for generations.
In 2018, there were more than 400 Tackies, and the population continues to grow, as does the breed's popularity.
Initial inspection showed that the Marsh Tackies did in fact resemble Florida Cracker horses, but had some distinct differences.