TLC

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tender loving care

Compassionate, caring, protective attention or treatment. Sometimes abbreviated to TLC, especially when using the term more jocularly or lightheartedly. I find that giving these patients tender loving care is as beneficial to them as their medication, sometimes more so. Your plants just need a little tender loving care and they'll be green and healthy again in no time!
See also: care, loving, tender

TLC

An initialism of "tender loving care" or, less commonly, "tender love and care," referring to compassionate, caring, protective attention or treatment. I'm really looking forward to my all-inclusive spa retreat. After so many hectic, stressful weeks, I'm in need of some real TLC right now. I love when my kids come home from college so I can give them a little TLC.
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

tender loving care

Also, TLC. Solicitous and compassionate care, as in These houseplants sure have had tender loving care, or Older house for sale, needs some renovation and TLC. Originally used to describe the work of care-givers such as nurses, this term today is often used ironically or euphemistically. [Second half of 1900s]
See also: care, loving, tender
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

TLC

n. tender loving care. (Initialism.) This old car will keep running as long as I give it lots of TLC.
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

TLC

Acronym for tender loving care. In modern times this phrase is believed to have originated in a hospital or other sick-care setting, where it alludes to kind and solicitous treatment by nurses. From the mid-1900s on it caught on in a more general way, particularly among songwriters, according to wordsmith Nigel Rees, who found nearly a dozen songs with this title written between 1960 and 1983. Today the term, both spelled out and abbreviated, is applied to kind or gentle treatment for almost anything—a pet, person, plant, automobile, and so on. It has just about replaced the almost synonymous tea and sympathy, meaning special kindness shown to someone who is upset. This term was always most common in Britain, where a cup of tea is standard treatment in such situations. It gained currency as the title of a play by Robert Anderson and a motion picture based on it (1956) about a prep school boy’s affair with a teacher’s wife, but it has largely died out, at least in America.
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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