stern

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Related to Sterns: NWJ

stem to stern

Completely or entirely, as from one end to the other. (The "stem" and the "stern" are opposite ends of a ship.) If that guy so much as looks at me the wrong way, I'll cut him from stem to stern, I swear! When I had the flu, I honestly ached from stem to stern and couldn't get out of bed for days.
See also: stem, stern

from stem to stern

Completely or entirely, as from one end to the other. (The "stem" and the "stern" are opposite ends of a ship.) If that guy so much as looks at me the wrong way, I'll cut him from stem to stern, I swear! When I had the flu, I honestly ached from stem to stern and couldn't get out of bed for days.
See also: stem, stern

from stem to stern

 
1. Lit. from the front of a boat or ship to the back. He inspected the boat from stem to stern and decided he wanted to buy it.
2. Fig. from one end to another. Now, I have to clean the house from stem to stern. I polished my car carefully from stem to stern.
See also: stem, stern

from soup to nuts

Also, from A to Z or start to finish or stem to stern . From beginning to end, throughout, as in We went through the whole agenda, from soup to nuts, or She had to learn a whole new system from A to Z, or It rained from start to finish, or We did over the whole house from stem to stern. The first expression, with its analogy to the first and last courses of a meal, appeared in slightly different forms (such as from potage to cheese) from the 1500s on; the precise wording here dates only from the mid-1900s. The second expression alludes to the first and last letters of the Roman alphabet; see also alpha and omega. The third comes from racing and alludes to the entire course of the race; it dates from the mid-1800s. The last variant is nautical, alluding to the front or stem, and rear or stern, of a vessel.
See also: nuts, soup

stem to stern

see under from soup to nuts.
See also: stem, stern

from soup to nuts

from beginning to end; completely. North American informal
Soup is likely to feature as the first course of a formal meal, while a selection of nuts may be offered as the final one.
See also: nuts, soup

from stem to stern

from the front to the back, especially of a ship.
See also: stem, stern

from ˌsoup to ˈnuts

(American English, informal) from beginning to end: She told me the whole story from soup to nuts.
This refers to a long meal that often begins with soup and ends with nuts.
See also: nuts, soup

from ˌstem to ˈstern

all the way from the front of a ship to the back: It was a small boat, less than thirty feet from stem to stern.
See also: stem, stern

stern

n. the posterior; buttocks. The little airplane crashed right into the stern of an enormous lady who didn’t even notice.

from stem to stern

From one end to another.
See also: stem, stern
References in classic literature ?
And to the stern King his home seemed more desolate and sad; for he missed the warm light, the happy flowers, and, more than all, the gay voice and bright face of little Violet.
The dandy, in the stern, with a careless look upward, tried with his foot to shove over the green leaves so as to cover the out-jutting butts of several rifles, but made the matter worse by exposing them more fully.
And again, just as I was reaching for the skiff, it ducked under the ship's stern and out of danger.
Each time we missed the skiff at the stern, they set up a wild cheer and dashed across to the other side of the Lancashire Queen to see the chase to wind-ward.
The launch with a dull thud ran up upon the mud-bank, with her bow in the air and her stern flush with the water.
The Ghost was going very slowly, and when her stern lifted on a wave and she slipped forward she pulled the wretch to the surface and gave him a moment in which to breathe; but between each lift the stern fell, and while the bow lazily climbed the next wave the line slacked and he sank beneath.
When Mugridge was directly beneath us, the stern descended the slope of a passing wave, thus giving the advantage to the shark.
With a wickedness do I begin every day: I mock at the winter with a cold bath: on that account grumbleth my stern house-mate.
Clattering with diction and dice, I outwit the solemn assistants: all those stern watchers, shall my will and purpose elude.
She knew Miss Polly now as a stern, severe-faced woman who frowned if a knife clattered to the floor, or if a door banged--but who never thought to smile even when knives and doors were still.
Before she had finished speaking, there had come back into his face the stern, reproachful expression of the dying man's envy of the living.
This was proclaimed in white letters a foot long spaced widely across the stern (somewhat like the lettering of a shop-sign) under the cottage windows.
In the same fiddle-case a photograph of my predecessor, taken lately in Saigon, repre sented in front of a garden view, and in company of a female in strange draperies, an elderly, squat, rugged man of stern aspect in a clumsy suit of black broadcloth, and with the hair brushed forward above the temples in a manner reminding one of a boar's tusks.
Always watching his face, the girl instantly answered to the action in her sculling; presently the boat swung round, quivered as from a sudden jerk, and the upper half of the man was stretched out over the stern.
It escaped his attention, for he was glancing over the stern at something the boat had in tow.