Standing Rock

Standing Rock

A shorthand reference to the Standing Rock Sioux tribe in North Dakota. The phrase gained popularity amidst opposition to the Dakota Access Pipeline and its planned use of Native American grounds in North Dakota. There are more protests planned today in support of Standing Rock.
See also: rock, standing
References in periodicals archive ?
From Ferguson to Palestine, Charlottesville to Standing Rock.
The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe captured world attention through its peaceful resistance to the Dakota Access Pipeline, which threatens the drinking water of 18 million people and indigenous sovereignty.
It's a post-election social justice project inspired by the likes of writer Roxane Gay, the protest at Standing Rock, and the musical Fun Home.
Laurel Vermillion, a recognized member of the Hunkpapa-Lakota peoples of the Standing Rock Reservation, is the president of Sitting Bull College (SBC).
15) Most recently state and federal governments authorized construction of the Dakota Access pipeline across the Missouri River just upstream from the Standing Rock and Cheyenne River reservations and through territory to which the Sioux claim treaty rights.
Caption: Floral vest by Holly Young, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe (Dakota)
Among the stories included are: Origin of the Pleiades, The Legend of the Cherokee Rose, The Quill-Work Girl and Her Seven Brothers, The Legend of Standing Rock, The Simpleton's Wisdom, The Foster Child of the Deer, and The Raven.
On a November morning at the height of the Standing Rock standoff, scores of anti-pipeline protesters stripped off their parkas and dog-paddled across the Cantapeta Creek, an icy ribbon of water that wends into the Missouri River.
The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe filed several lawsuits against the Corps, each alleging different violations of law, including:
The Native American naming ceremony, led by Phyllis Young, a prominent Native American elder and member of Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, was held in honor of Jean-Louis Bourgeois, a 76-year-old wealthy activist in New York and the son of sculptor Louise Bourgeois who died in 2010 at the age of 98.
And in the United States, an Indigenous coalition led by the Standing Rock Sioux spearheaded a captivating global movement to assert their Indigenous and treaty rights against the Dakota Access Pipeline.
In 2016, members of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe in North Dakota protested construction of an oil pipeline running through Indian land.
The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, which protested the planned pipeline and warned of potential threats to drinking water supplies and the environment, condemned the incident.
In addition, the Army Corps reached out to the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe nearly a dozen times to discuss archaeological and other surveys conducted before finalizing the Dakota Access route.
She's also once again become a shining light in the anti-Trump protests that have rolled across the United States -- including one last fall against the Dakota Pipeline at Standing Rock and at women's marches in January.