stand your ground law

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stand your ground law

In the United States, a law that allows one to use force that would otherwise be illegal against a person that they perceive as posing an immediate threat of serious bodily harm. The name comes from the idea that one can "stand one's ground" rather than retreat. The shooter's state has a stand your ground law, so it's unlikely he'll face any charges, even though the man he shot was unarmed.
See also: ground, law, stand
References in periodicals archive ?
Korea has a "stand-your-ground law" that allows people to use force to protect themselves or others against threats.
She explains that stand-your-ground law "signals a social-cultural climate that makes the destruction and death of black bodies inevitable and even permissible." It is the foundation of what can be called "American exceptionalism," an ideology that privileges Anglo-Saxon heritage over against all others.
The castle doctrine and stand-your-ground law. Retrieved from http://cga.ct.gov/2012/ rpt/2012-R-0172.htm
The next year, when a jury--again, made up of the deceased man's peers--found Zimmerman not guilty, the UN on September 3 called on the Obama administration to "nullify" Florida's popular stand-your-ground law, citing the Trayvon Martin case.
The July 22 front-page article on self-defense laws incorrectly stated that "Oregon does not have a stand-your-ground law" ("States expected to stand ground").
The Rev Jesse Jackson said: "The stand-your-ground law lends itself to massive interpretations because it is so subjective.
states have adopted the so-called stand-your-ground law. Under the law, a person is justified in using deadly force in self-defense when there is reasonable belief of an unlawful threat.
Tribes that wish to support gun rights are free to do so (as some have), but enacting an expanded right to self-defense, such as a stand-your-ground law, as a partial solution to on-reservation crime is likely to backfire and harm the very tribal members who would be expected to benefit from such a law.
"Please don't attempt to invoke the Castle Doctrine," he said to everyone watching the hearing, referring to Texas' stand-your-ground law.
26 fatal shooting of Trayvon Martin, 17, in Sanford, Fla., by a defendant who is claiming the Florida stand-your-ground law in his defense.
According to a Florida appellate court, that state's "stand-your-ground law allows the use of deadly force for self-protection even if an attacker or intruder is in retreat," the Palm Beach Post notes.
In state legislatures they pushed aggressive agendas that brought concealed carry, shooting-range protection and stand-your-ground laws to the vast majority of jurisdictions.
A balanced, thoughtful history of stand-your-ground laws in English common law and modern America is urgently needed.
Texas also has stand-your-ground laws, permitting a civilian to defend herself against a threat -- whether real or perceived -- with the level of force reasonably believed necessary.