spin off

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spin off

1. verb To create or derive something from a larger or original thing. A noun or pronoun can be used between "spin" and "off." I heard they're spinning another show off from the political drama that will focus on the two main journalists and their relationship.
2. verb For a company to separate from one of its divisions or holdings through sale, reorganization, or other means. A noun or pronoun can be used between "spin" and "off." Only two years after purchasing it, the company has decided to spin off its VR division.
3. noun Something created or derived from a larger or original thing. As a noun, the phrase is usually hyphenated. Because it has become much more popular than the original, not many people know that this series is actually a spin-off.
See also: off, spin

spin something off

 
1. Lit. [for something rotating] to release a part that flies away. The propeller spun one of its blades off and then fell apart all together. It spun off one of its blades.
2. Fig. [for a business] to divest itself of one of its subparts. The large company spun one of its smaller divisions off. It spun off a subsidiary and used the cash to pay down its debt.
3. Fig. [for an enterprise] to produce useful or profitable side effects or products. We will be able to spin off a number of additional products. The development of this product will allow us to spin off dozens of smaller, innovative products for years to come.
See also: off, spin

spin off

[for something] to part and fly away from something that is spinning; [for something] to detach or break loose from something. The blade of the lawn mower spun off, but fortunately no one was injured. The rusted-on nut spun off easily after I got it loosened.
See also: off, spin

spin off

Derive or produce from something else, especially a small part from a larger whole. For example, The corporation decided to spin off the automobile parts division, or Her column was spun off from her book on this subject. The expression transfers the throwing off by centrifugal force, as in spinning, to other enterprises. [Mid-1900s]
See also: off, spin

spin off

v.
To derive something, such as a company or product, from some source: The television network decided to spin a new show off from its popular comedy series. The media conglomerate spun off its entertainment division.
See also: off, spin
References in periodicals archive ?
The first split off from PII came in July of last year when Eagle Publishing, a subsidiary, was spun off as an independent company.
In a deal valued at $910 million, by the end of 1998 Insignia Financial Services, which is traded on the New York Stock Exchange as INF, will be merged with the Denver-based Apartment Investment & Management Company (AIMCO) traded on the NYSE under AIV, and then Insignia/ESG will be spun off into a new, publicly traded company.
Another study demonstrated how production, technological, and marketing knowledge were related to the post-spin-off growth of firms spun off from parent firms (Sapienza, Parhankangas, & Autio, 2004).
Credit Suisse (NYSE: CS) has announced that it has spun off DLJ Merchant Banking Partners, a mid-market leveraged buyout business.
We measure this variable as a dummy equal to one if the parent and subsidiary are in different industries (measured by the two-digit SIC code), and as zero if the parent and subsidiary to be spun off are in the same industry.