splitting

(redirected from Splittings)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to Splittings: Spliting
Like this video? Subscribe to our free daily email and get a new idiom video every day!

hair-splitting

1. modifier Of or characterized by minute and irrelevant differences or details in an argument. There have been some hair-splitting changes to the script, but other than that, it's the same as it ever was.
2. noun The act of scrutinizing minute, irrelevant, or imperceptible differences or details. We would get a lot more done in these meetings if everyone did less hair-splitting.

make like a banana and split

humorous slang To depart or leave, especially at once or in a hurry. (A pun on "to split," a slang term meaning to leave or depart, and a "banana split," an ice-cream-based dessert featuring a banana halved lengthwise.) This carnival turned out to be really boring. Come on, let's make like a banana and split! A: "Where are Jeff and Sally?" B: "They needed to get home to feed the baby, so they made like a banana and split."
See also: and, banana, like, make, split

split (one's) sides

To laugh uproariously or hysterically. Your jokes are perfect for your speech tonight. You'll have them splitting their sides!
See also: side, split

split hairs

To make or focus on trivial or petty details, differences, or distinctions. I'm sorry to split hairs, but your portion of the bill is $25.97, not $25.79. I actually think it was your responsibility, not Dave's, but let's not split hairs about it.
See also: hair, split

split the difference

To find and agree upon the point halfway or nearly halfway between two amounts of something, especially money. A: "I'll give you $100 for the computer." B: "I'm sorry, but I can't take lower than $150." A: "Why don't we split the difference and call it $125?"
See also: difference, split

split (something) down the middle

To divide or share the cost of something exactly equally. While I appreciate the offer and the sentiment, I insist that we split the bill down the middle—I don't like someone paying for me on a first date.
See also: down, middle, split

split the ticket

To vote for candidates from more than one political party for different roles in public office. It has become increasingly uncommon for voters to split the ticket by voting for candidates from both parties.
See also: split, ticket

split off

1. To detach, separate, or sever from some larger thing or piece. Groups of students split off to work on the project. A large chunk of rock split off from the side of the mountain and rolled down into the ravine.
2. To detach, separate, or sever something (from some larger thing or piece). A noun or pronoun can be used between "split" and "off." Split the tough, fibrous ends off of the asparagus stalks before you pop them in the oven. She split off a piece of chocolate for me.
See also: off, split

split up

1. To separate or divide into two or more pieces, groups, sets, etc. We'll find them faster if we all split up. The polar ice caps are going to start splitting up if global temperatures continue to rise.
2. To cause something or a group to separate or divide into two or more smaller pieces, groups, sets, etc. A noun or pronoun can be used between "split" and "up." Take this axe and go split those logs up into firewood. The teacher split up the class to work on the project in groups.
3. To end a romantic relationship with someone else. My parents split up when I was only five years old. Mary says that she split up with Sarah, but they've had such an off-again-on-again relationship that none of us is surprised anymore.
4. To cause a romantic couple to end their relationship. A noun or pronoun can be used between "split" and "up." My mom's gambling issues very nearly split up her marriage, but she got counseling and they're still together to this day. Tommy's been conniving to split Jenny and Phil up because he's still madly in love with her.
See also: split, up

split hairs

Fig. to quibble; to try to make petty distinctions. They don't have any serious differences. They are just splitting hairs. Don't waste time splitting hairs. Accept it the way it is.
See also: hair, split

split off (from something)

to separate away from something; to sever connection with and separate from something. A large iceberg split off from the glacier and made an enormous splash. A giant chunk of ice split off and floated away.
See also: off, split

split someone or something up (into something)

to divide people or things up into something, such as groups. I had to split the group up into two sectionsthere were so many who showed up. I split up the class into two discussion sections.
See also: split, up

split something off (of) something

 and split something off
to sever connection with something; to separate from something. (Of is usually retained before pronouns.) Dave split a piece of wood off the log to use for kindling. He split off a stick of wood.
See also: off, split

split the difference

to divide the difference evenly (with someone else). You want to sell for $120, and I want to buy for $100. Let's split the difference and close the deal at $110. I don't want to split the difference. I want $120.
See also: difference, split

split up (with someone)

[for someone] to separate from someone; to break up a marriage or love affair. Jeff split up with Judy. I had heard that they had split up with each other.
See also: split, up

splitting headache

Fig. a severe headache, as if one's head were splitting open. I'm sorry, I can't. I have a splitting headache. Maybe Fred will play bridge with you. This splitting headache has been going on for hours.
See also: headache, splitting

split hairs

Make trivial distinctions, quibble, as in Let's not split hairs about whose turn it is; I'll close up today and you do it tomorrow. This metaphoric idiom transfers dividing so fine an object as a single hair to other petty divisions. [Second half of 1600s]
See also: hair, split

split the difference

Compromise between two close figures, divide the remainder equally. For example, You're asking $5,000 for the car and I'm offering $4,000; let's split the difference and make it $4,500 . [c. 1700]
See also: difference, split

split hairs

If someone splits hairs, they argue about very small details or find very small differences between things which are really very similar. More than half the cases they complained about were not, in fact, on Garzon's list, but let's not split hairs. Don't split hairs. You know what I'm getting at. Note: You can also accuse someone of hair-splitting. We were becoming impatient with hair-splitting over legal technicalities.
See also: hair, split

split hairs

make small and overfine distinctions.
This expression was first recorded in the late 17th century. Split straws, dating from the 19th century, is a less common version.
See also: hair, split

split the difference

take the average of two proposed amounts.
See also: difference, split

split the ticket (or your vote)

vote for candidates of more than one party. US
See also: split, ticket

split the ˈdifference

agree on an amount of something, such as money, which is halfway between two others: John offered €60, but Peter wanted €100. Finally they split the difference and agreed on €80.
See also: difference, split

split ˈhairs

(disapproving) pay too much attention in an argument to differences that are very small and not important: You might think I’m just splitting hairs, but what exactly do you mean by ‘a significant improvement’? ▶ ˈhair-splitting noun
See also: hair, split

split the ˈticket

(American English, politics) vote for candidates from more than one party: Election officials are reminding voters that they may ‘split their ticket’ in the November election, unlike a state primary election.
See also: split, ticket

split off

v.
1. To separate something; detach something: The babysitter split off a piece of fruit and shared it with the child. Before putting the flowers in water, I split the stem ends off.
2. To become separated from something: The political party split off from a broader coalition. As the temperature rose, a large section of the iceberg split off.
See also: off, split

split up

v.
1. To separate someone or something, such as people or groups; disunite someone or something: Artistic differences split up the band. They've been together too long to let a little argument split them up.
2. To become divided or part company as a result of discord or disagreement: My parents split up after 20 years of marriage.
3. To divide something, as for convenience or proper ordering: They split up the remainder of the money among themselves and parted ways. We split the project up into stages.
4. To become divided or be divisible: Let's split up into teams. This poem doesn't split up into stanzas very well.
See also: split, up

split up

1. in. to separate. The two split up and went their separate ways.
2. n. an act of separating or breaking up. (Usually split-up.) Everyone was mentally prepared for the company’s split-up.
See also: split, up

split hairs

To see or make trivial distinctions; quibble.
See also: hair, split

split the difference

To take half of a disputed amount as a compromise.
See also: difference, split
References in periodicals archive ?
Support theory employs two devices to bound the support of a preconditioner: one is the splitting lemma [1, 9], and the other is the symmetric product support lemma [5].
In early support-theory papers [1, 9], three main tools were used: the support lemma, the splitting lemma and the congestion-dilation lemma.
They also show that the bounds that were previously derived by the splitting and congestion-dilation lemmas can be directly obtained by applying their new lemma together with the norm bound [[parallel]W[parallel].
However, recent results by Spielman and Teng again used the splitting lemma [14, 16].
The Symmetric Product Support Lemma Implies the Splitting Lemma.
The following splittings are stable, the condition numbers depend on the coefficients [c.
Among the splittings presented above, we are interested most in the splittings (5.
For refining the other splittings they do depend on [c.
Applying the additive subspace correction method on one of the splittings (5.
3) to establish the strengthened Cauchy-Schwarz inequalities for our concrete splittings into sample spaces.
When A is Hermitian and positive definite, algorithms 2 and 3 may not converge even if the splittings are P-regular.
Consider further the P-regular splittings of P = [B.
5 are based on P-regular splittings of a Hermitian matrix.
Another way to get splittings satisfying the hypotheses of that theorem consists in using a relaxation parameter [omega] in the outer splitting so that the new splitting will be A = 1 (1-[omega]/[omega] M + N).
l)] can be viewed as the iteration matrix of a multisplitting method using the P-regular splittings A = [R.