speak softly and carry a big stick

speak softly and carry a big stick

Attempt peaceful negotiations while also being prepared for confrontation by displaying one's power, especially elements of force. The phrase was popularized by US President Theodore Roosevelt in a 1903 speech. Because that group is violent and unpredictable, I think you need to speak softly and carry a big stick when you deal with them.
See also: and, big, carry, softly, speak, stick

speak softly and carry a big stick

Back up what you say with a show of strength. This term is a quotation from a speech by President Theodore Roosevelt on September 2, 1901, in which he said the country must keep on training a highly efficient navy in order to back up the Monroe Doctrine. It was often repeated and is by no means obsolete. Opera singer Renée Fleming referred to it in The Inner Voice (2004, describing her manager: “He is thoughtful, has enormous integrity, is highly respected, and speaks softly but carries . . . well, you know.”
See also: and, big, carry, softly, speak, stick
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, drawing on the century old dictum espoused by visionary US President, Theodore Roosevelt, Pakistan would do well to 'Speak softly and carry a Big Stick,' in response to the increasingly bellicose rhetoric being espoused by India.
What ever happened to Teddy Roosevelt's wise foreign policy maxim "speak softly and carry a big stick"?
President Theodore Roosevelt's foreign policy was summed up in his famous phrase: "Speak softly and carry a big stick." President Barack Obama's might be summarized as, "Speak loudly and carry a small stick, then impale yourself on it." The much talked up, talked down, on, off, missile strike against Syria was never more than a futile gesture.
In 1901, Vice President Theodore Roosevelt offered the advice ''Speak softly and carry a big stick'' in a speech at the Minnesota State Fair.
The name is a play on the ship's nickname "America's Big Stick," which comes from "Speak softly and carry a big stick; you will go far," a West African proverb and policy used by the ship's namesake, President Theodore Roosevelt, throughout his career.
Barack Obama is often compared to Franklin Delano Roosevelt, but it is from the book of another Roosevelt that he has taken a leaf: President Theodore Roosevelt, who, 108 years ago, advised his successors: "Speak softly and carry a big stick!"
By Uri Avnery Barack Obama is often compared to Franklin Delano Roosevelt, but it is from the book of another Roosevelt that he has taken a leaf: President Theodore Roosevelt, who, 108 years ago, advised his successors: "Speak softly and carry a big stick!" This week, the whole world saw how this is done.
Speak Softly and Carry a Big Stick: How Local TV Broadcasters Exert Political Power, J.
Snider' s Speak Softly and Carry a Big Stick: How Local TV Broadcasters Exert Political Power.
From Teddy Roosevelt ("Speak softly and carry a big stick.") to Ronald Reagan ("I am not worried about the deficit.
The image of a president vainly trying to avoid foreign policy thickets but eventually devoting more attention to international matters than to domestic well-being is so familiar that the motto of American diplomacy may be less Teddy Roosevelt's "Speak softly and carry a big stick" than Michael Corleone's "Just when I thought I was out, they pull me back in!"
In 1903, President Theodore (Teddy) Roosevelt, a distant relative of FDR, did say "Speak softly and carry a big stick".
He said "speak softly and carry a big stick," and there is no doubt about the size of his stick--what is more difficult to find is evidence that he ever spoke softly.
"Speak softly and carry a big stick" was credited to Theodore Roosevelt a few weeks after becoming president.