song

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sing off the same songsheet

To have the same understanding of something as someone else; to say the same things about something as other people, especially in public. Primarily heard in UK. I think we should have a meeting with everyone who's involved in the project. That way, we'll all be singing off the same songsheet before we begin. Make sure everyone on the campaign is singing off the same songsheet before we release any kind of statement to the press.
See also: off, same, sing, songsheet

sing off the same songbook

To have the same understanding of something as someone else; to say the same things about something as other people, especially in public. Primarily heard in UK. I think we should have a meeting with everyone who's involved in the project. That way, we'll all be singing off the same songbook before we begin. Make sure everyone on the campaign is singing off the same songbook before we release any kind of statement to the press.
See also: off, same, sing, songbook

sing from the same songsheet

To have the same understanding of something as someone else; to say the same things about something as other people, especially in public. Primarily heard in UK. I think we should have a meeting with everyone who's involved in the project. That way, we'll all be singing from the same songsheet before we begin. Make sure everyone from the campaign is singing from the same songsheet before we release any kind of statement to the press.
See also: same, sing, songsheet

sing from the same songbook

To have the same understanding of something as someone else; to say the same things about something as other people, especially in public. Primarily heard in UK. I think we should have a meeting with everyone who's involved in the project. That way, we'll all be singing from the same songbook before we begin. Make sure everyone from the campaign is singing from the same songbook before we release any kind of statement to the press.
See also: same, sing, songbook

sing from the same hymn sheet

To have the same understanding of something as someone else; to say the same things about something as other people, especially in public. Primarily heard in UK. I think we should have a meeting with everyone who's involved in the project. That way, we'll all be singing from the same hymn sheet before we begin. Make sure everyone from the campaign is singing from the same hymn sheet before we release any kind of statement to the press.
See also: hymn, same, sheet, sing

siren song

Something that is seductive, enticing, or appealing, but that is or may prove to be dangerous, destructive, or disastrous. Alludes to the Sirens of Greek mythology, beautiful sea creatures who lured sailors to their deaths with enchanting music and voices. Even though most people see the risks of gambling, it's possible rewards remain a siren song to many. After his hit single brought the singer overnight fame and fortune, he was quickly lured by the siren song of drugs, alcohol, and promiscuous sexual activity.
See also: song

go for a song

To be sold for a very (and perhaps surprisingly) low price. Wow, I can't believe they let so many things at their yard sale go for a song. I would have marked up the prices a bit.
See also: song

song and dance

1. A long and elaborate explanation or presentation. Primarily heard in US. The whole song and dance to introduce the keynote speaker lasted longer than her speech!
2. A long and elaborate explanation told with the intent to deceive someone or justify something. When I questioned her about her tardiness, she gave me some song and dance about her car breaking down.
See also: and, dance, song

be on song

To be performing very well. After that terrible rehearsal, it's a miracle that the band was on song during the concert. It seems that their goalie is on song again after that serious injury last season. I don't know Kyle that well, but we're on speaking terms, and he seems nice enough.
See also: on, song

make a song and dance about (something)

To exaggerate or build up the importance of something more than necessary. (Usually used in the negative.) Look, I would really just rather not make a song and dance about my birthday, please. We just had a little kiss, but now he's making this whole song and dance about it.
See also: and, dance, make, song

*for a song

Fig. cheaply. (As if the singing of a song were payment. *Typically: buy something ~; get something ~; pick up someone ~.) No one else wanted it, so I picked it up for a song. I could buy this house for a song, because it's so ugly.
See also: song

go into a song and dance (about something)

 and go into the same old song and dance about something
Fig. to start repeating excuses or stories about something. Please don't go into your song and dance about how you always tried to do what was right. John went into his song and dance about how he won the war all by himself. He always goes into the same old song and dance every time he makes a mistake.
See also: and, dance, song

sell something for a song

Fig. to sell something for very little money. (As in trading something of value for the singing of a song.) I had to sell my car for a song because I needed the money in a hurry. I have two geometry books and I would sell one of them for a song.
See also: sell, song

sing a different tune

 and sing another tune
Fig. to change one's manner, usually from bad to good. (Almost the same as dance to another tune.) When she learned that I was a bank director, she began to sing a different tune. You will sing another tune as soon as you find out how right I am!
See also: different, sing, tune

swan song

Fig. the last work or performance of a playwright, musician, actor, etc., before death or retirement. His portrayal of Lear was the actor's swan song. We didn't know that her performance last night was the singer's swan song.
See also: song, swan

burst into

1. Also, burst out in or into . Break out into sudden activity. For example, burst into flames means "break out in a fire," as in This dry woodpile may well burst into flames. A version of this term, which dates from the 16th century, was used figuratively by John Milton: "Fame is the spur ... But the fair guerdon [reward] when we hope to find, and think to burst out into sudden blaze" ( Lycidas, 1637).
2. Also, burst out. Give sudden utterance to. For example, burst into tears or laughter or song or speech or burst out crying or laughing or singing , etc. mean "begin suddenly to weep, laugh, sing," and so on, as in When she saw him, she burst into tears, or I burst out laughing when I saw their outfits, or When they brought in the cake, we all burst into song. These terms have been so used since the late 1300s.
See also: burst

for a song

Very cheaply, for little money, especially for less than something is worth. For example, "I know a man ... sold a goodly manor for a song" (Shakespeare, All's Well That Ends Well, 3:2). This idiom alludes to the pennies given to street singers or to the small cost of sheet music. [Late 1500s]
See also: song

sing a different tune

Also, sing another tune. See change one's tune.
See also: different, sing, tune

song and dance

An elaborate story or effort to explain and justify something, or to deceive and mislead someone. For example, Do you really believe his song and dance about the alarm not going off, being stopped for speeding, and then the car breaking down? or At every annual meeting the chairman goes through the same song and dance about the company's great future plans . This term originally referred to a vaudeville act featuring song and dance. [Late 1800s]
See also: and, dance, song

swan song

A final accomplishment or performance, one's last work. For example, I'm resigning tomorrow; this project was my swan song. This term alludes to the old belief that swans normally are mute but burst into beautiful song moments before they die. Although the idea is much older, the term was first recorded in English only in 1890.
See also: song, swan

sing a different tune

or

sing a different song

1. If someone sings a different tune or sings a different song, they express an opinion which is the opposite of the opinion that they expressed a short time ago. Only a week ago, Peters was insisting that the minister resign yet suddenly, for no apparent reason, he is singing a different tune. Note: You can also say that someone sings the same tune or sings the same song, meaning that they continue to express the same opinion. The president basically sent the signal that he's going to keep singing the same tune he's been singing.
2. If people sing a different tune or sing a different song, they express different opinions about the same subject. The problem of homelessness is very serious and it doesn't help that two Government departments are singing different songs. Note: You can also say that people sing the same tune or sing the same song, to mean that they express the same opinion about something. The party were at last united, all singing the same tune.
See also: different, sing, tune

sing from the same hymn sheet

or

sing from the same song sheet

BRITISH
If two or more people sing from the same hymn sheet or sing from the same song sheet, they express the same opinions about a subject in public. The important thing is to bring together the departments so that we're all singing from the same hymn sheet. As she and her husband deal with the latest scandal, they can at least be relied on to sing from the same song sheet.
See also: hymn, same, sheet, sing

for a song

COMMON If you buy something for a song, you buy it for very little money. She was wearing a beautiful hat which she'd picked up for a song in Camden Market. She wore a lot of costume jewellery which she bought for a song off second-hand stalls. Note: You can also say that something goes for a song or is sold for a song, meaning that it is sold very cheaply. In the early nineties their shares went for a song. I know of good, solid, stone-built houses which have been sold by councils for a song. Note: This expression may be a reference to printed song sheets, which were very cheap. Alternatively, it may refer to small amounts of money that passers-by give to someone who is singing in the street.
See also: song

make a song and dance about something

mainly BRITISH
If someone makes a song and dance about something, they react in a very anxious, excited, or angry way to something that is not important. They're unhappy about the extra hours they've been asked to work and they're making a real song and dance about it. People have to deal with problems like this every day and they don't go around making a song and dance about it. Note: You can also just talk about a song and dance. They sorted the matter out without any song and dance.
See also: and, dance, make, something, song

on song

BRITISH, JOURNALISM
COMMON If a sports player is on song, they are playing very well. When I was on song, I knew my opponents couldn't stop me. The whole team was on song.
See also: on, song

a swan song

A swan song is the last performance or piece of work that someone does in their career. He had made up his mind that this show was going to be his swan song. Note: This expression developed from a belief that a dying swan sings.
See also: song, swan

burst into

v.
1. To enter some place suddenly and forcefully: The police burst into the room and conducted a raid.
2. To start doing something suddenly: Sometimes we burst into song while we're hiking in the mountains.
See also: burst

for a song

Informal
At a low price: bought the antique tray for a song.
See also: song

swan song

Last effort. An ancient belief held that swans, who are usually silent, burst into beautiful song with their dying breaths. As a phrase, “swan song” connotes a last burst of energy before expiring.
See also: song, swan
References in classic literature ?
In this way they swept, in full song and with regular flourish of the paddle, round New York, in a still summer evening, to the wonder and admiration of its inhabitants, who had never before witnessed on their waters, a nautical apparition of the kind.
Tis well sung," quoth Robin, "but, cousin, I tell thee plain, I would rather hear a stout fellow like thee sing some lusty ballad than a finicking song of flowers and birds, and what not.
Speaking of comic songs and parties, reminds me of a rather curious incident at which I once assisted; which, as it throws much light upon the inner mental working of human nature in general, ought, I think, to be recorded in these pages.
Haven't time to be a public benefactor, so I'll just sing you this little song for your own amusement.
He went to live with the Meat-Eaters and to be a singer of songs to the king.
Burns' significant production, also, is not altogether limited to songs.
And then follow "The British Grenadiers," "Billy Taylor," "The Siege of Seringapatam," "Three Jolly Postboys," and other vociferous songs in rapid succession, including "The Chesapeake and Shannon," a song lately introduced in honour of old Brooke; and when they come to the words,
Wherefore came she now, what was the song she sang, and why did she touch me with a spear?
The song of pleasant stations beside the salt lagoons, The song of blowing squadrons that shuffled down the dunes, The song of midnight dances that churned the sea to flame-- The Beaches of Lukannon--before the sealers came!
By 'language embellished,' I mean language into which rhythm, 'harmony,' and song enter.
And I'll sing oo a little song," he said, as he rolled it about.
This is the song that Mowgli heard behind him in the Jungle till he came to Messua's door again.
let the burial rite be read - the funeral song be sung
The goldsmith was in his workshop making a gold chain, when he heard the song of the bird on his roof.
Give me a red rose," she cried, "and I will sing you my sweetest song.