wise as Solomon

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Related to Solomon: Song of Solomon, Solomon Software

*wise as Solomon

 and *wise as an owl
very wise. (*Also: as ~.) If you are in trouble, get Chris to advise you. He's as wise as Solomon. This is a difficult problem. You'd need to be as wise as an owl to be able to solve it.
See also: wise
References in classic literature ?
'Ah, well,' he said, 'that is where Solomon really had his mines, his diamond mines, I mean.'
why, what is "Suliman" but a corruption of Solomon?[*] Besides, an old Isanusi or witch doctoress up in the Manica country told me all about it.
In the large wainscoted parlor too there were constantly pairs of eyes on the watch, and own relatives eager to be "sitters-up." Many came, lunched, and departed, but Brother Solomon and the lady who had been Jane Featherstone for twenty-five years before she was Mrs.
Waule began--but Solomon put his hand before her repressingly.
"Ruffle your feathers," said that grim old Solomon, and Peter tried most desperately hard to ruffle his feathers, but he had none.
"Poor little half-and-half," said Solomon, who was not really hard-hearted, "you will never be able to fly again, not even on windy days.
"Let him come out too," said Solomon. "Does he think me a ghost?"
As she did so, Solomon turned to the followers of the Good Republican Brutus of Antiquity, and offered a few words of explanation in the French language, which caused them all to relapse into their former places and pursuits.
We rode across the Valley of Hinnom, between two of the Pools of Gihon, and by an aqueduct built by Solomon, which still conveys water to the city.
The famous pool looked exactly as it looked in Solomon's time, no doubt, and the same dusky, Oriental women, came down in their old Oriental way, and carried off jars of the water on their heads, just as they did three thousand years ago, and just as they will do fifty thousand years hence if any of them are still left on earth.
But these treasures were all produced by enchantment, for the maiden could make anything she wished appear by the help of King Solomon's signet ring; only none of these things remained fixed; they passed away like the wind without leaving a trace behind.
The ring formerly belonged to King Solomon, the wisest of kings, during whose reign the wisest men lived.
She would run over her correspondence, at breakfast, with lively eyes, and scream out interesting passages in a joyous voice at the deaf old lady, prefacing each extract by the warning shout, "Solomon says!" She had the trick of firing off Solomon's utterances also upon strangers, astonishing them easily by the unfamiliar text and the unexpectedly jocular vein of these quotations.
"Here, Solomon," said the Squire, with loud patronage.
In a low voice they all acquiesced, and Solomon went on: