snail

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Related to Snails: Garden snails
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at a snail's pace

Very slowly (as a snail is known to move very slowly). My research is moving at a snail's pace—every experiment I've tried so far has failed. We'll never get there on time with you driving at a snail's pace!
See also: pace

snail mail

Paper mail sent through the postal service (as opposed to email). Snails are thought of as very slow. A: "Did we get any exciting snail mail today?" B: "Nah, just some bills." Wait, you sent the invitations snail mail? Why didn't you just do e-vites?
See also: mail, snail

snail's pace

A very slow, arduous pace or rate. My research is moving at a snail's pace—every experiment I've tried so far has failed. We're never going to recoup our development costs if the snail's pace of these sales doesn't pick up.
See also: pace

at a snail's gallop

Very slowly. Snails are known for moving very slowly. My research is moving at a snail's gallop—every experiment I've tried so far has failed. We'll never get there on time with you driving at a snail's gallop!
See also: gallop

at a snail's pace

 and at a snail's gallop
very slowly. Things are moving along at a snail's pace here, but we'll finish on time—have no fear. Poor old Wally is creeping at a snail's gallop because his car has a flat tire.
See also: pace

snail mail

Ordinary postal service, as opposed to electronic communications. For example, He hasn't taken to his computer so he's still using snail mail. This slangy idiom, alluding to the alleged slowness of the snail, caught on at least partly for its rhyme. [1980s]
See also: mail, snail

snail's pace

A very slow pace, as in They're making progress with testing the new vaccine, but at a snail's pace. [c. 1400]
See also: pace

at a snail's pace

COMMON If something is moving or happening at a snail's pace, it is moving or happening very slowly. The vote counting continues at a snail's pace but already clear results are emerging. The economy grew at a snail's pace in the first three months of this year. She was driving at a snail's pace, looking in every house. Note: You can also use snail's pace before a noun. Observers hope that the meeting will speed up two years of snail's-pace progress. Note: You usually use this expression when you think that it would be better if it went more quickly.
See also: pace

at a snail's pace

extremely slowly.
See also: pace

at a ˈsnail’s pace

(informal) very slowly: My grandmother drove the car at a snail’s pace.
See also: pace

ˈsnail mail

(informal, humorous) used especially by people who use email on computers to describe the system of sending letters by ordinary mail: I’d love to hear from you, either by email or snail mail.
See also: mail, snail

at a snail’s pace

and at a snail’s gallop
mod. very slowly. Poor old Willy is creeping at a snail’s gallop because his car has a flat tire. The building project is coming along at a snail’s pace.
See also: pace

at a snail’s gallop

verb
See also: gallop

snail-mail

n. post office mail; regular mail as opposed to electronic mail. (Refers to the slowness of regular mail in comparison to electronic mail or faxes.) There are lots of color pictures in the article, so I will send you the original by snail-mail.

at a snail's pace

Very slowly. The slowness of snails was pointed out about 200 b.c. by the Roman poet Plautus and the term “snail’s pace” in English goes back to about 1400. Relative to its size, however, a snail travels a considerable distance each day, using the undersurface of its muscular foot to propel itself.
See also: pace
References in periodicals archive ?
More than 11,000 greater Bermuda land snails, bred at a British zoo, have been given a new home on Morgan's Island, which is owned by the Bermuda National Trust (BNT).
Rami Salman, a Lebanese snail farmer, said snails' popularity was also increasing in North America and Southeast Asia, perhaps because the mollusk has high protein content and is touted by some doctors and nutritionists as a healthy alternative to traditional meat products.
pfeifferi snails (Figure, panel A); large numbers (>50), along with innumerable dead shells, were again found at site 9.
While the snails that the CTU team found in Argao were barely visible, their mere presence indicated that the forests were 'alive,' he said.
Galway and Kildare have five snail farms, while Dublin and Wexford are each home to four of the businesses.
THE Ministry of Defence Staff Agricultural Cooperative Society (MODACS), has entered a partnership with FarmKonnect Nigeria worth $460,000 towards accomplishing Igbeja Snail Village project, in Okemesi, Ekiti State.
Llyn Peninsula producer Richard Hughes is planning to breed edible outdoor snails, sell them to chefs and perhaps harvest their slime for beauty products.
Fiona Carmichael, a keeper at the safari park, said:"African land snails are hermaphrodites - which is a fancy way of saying that one snail is both male and female.
Apple snails (genus Pomacea) are listed among the 100 most damaging invasive species on the planet (Lowe et al., 2000).
The productivity of snails consumed in Nigeria is affected by parasites they harbour.
They experimented with Sea Snails because they have impressive memory habits and large neurons which makes them easier to work with.
Due to their tolerance to a wide range of temperatures, giant African land snails are a highly invasive pest in many parts of the world.
Larvae that are known to infect lymnaeid snails belong to superfamilies Schistosomatoidea, Fasciolidae, Clinostomoidea, Paramphistomoidea, Echinostomatoidea, Diplostomoidea, and Pronocephaloidea [8], which cause diseases when transmitted to humans and animals [9].
Based from the observations on their habits in the field, this species was observed to have a remarkable broad range of host plants as reported in other studies [12] although younger snails prefer the soft textured plants such as banana (Musa sp.) and the older snails prefer herbaceous vascular plants such as Carica papaya.
Tiny snails from Scotland have been recognised as an elite food to save them from extinction.