scrooge

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scrooge

A miserly, miserable, and utterly uncharitable person. A reference to the character Ebenezer Scrooge in Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol, who exhibited such traits. The boss always turns into such a scrooge when we ask him for additional funding. I've never seen such a scrooge in all my life. She wouldn't even lend me enough change to call a cab home from the payphone.
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

scrooge

(skrudʒ)
n. a stingy person; a penny-pincher. (From the character in Dickens’s A Christmas Carol.) Ask scrooge over there if you can borrow a quarter to call the cops.
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in classic literature ?
Nobody under the table, nobody under the sofa; a small fire in the grate; spoon and basin ready; and the little saucepan of gruel (Scrooge had a cold in his head) upon the hob.
`Humbug!' said Scrooge; and walked across the room.
Scrooge then remembered to have heard that ghosts in haunted houses were described as dragging chains.
`It's humbug still!' said Scrooge. `I won't believe it.'
It was long, and wound about him like a tail; and it was made (for Scrooge observed it closely) of cash-boxes, keys, padlocks, ledgers, deeds, and heavy purses wrought in steel.
Scrooge had often heard it said that Marley had no bowels, but he had never believed it until now.
`Who were you then?' said Scrooge, raising his voice.
`Can you -- can you sit down?' asked Scrooge, looking doubtfully at him.
Scrooge asked the question, because he didn't know whether a ghost so transparent might find himself in a condition to take a chair; and felt that in the event of its being impossible, it might involve the necessity of an embarrassing explanation.
`Because,' said Scrooge, `a little thing affects them.
Scrooge was not much in the habit of cracking jokes, nor did he feel, in his heart, by any means waggish then.
To sit, staring at those fixed glazed eyes, in silence for a moment, would play, Scrooge felt, the very deuce with him.
`You see this toothpick?' said Scrooge, returning quickly to the charge, for the reason just assigned; and wishing, though it were only for a second, to divert the vision's stony gaze from himself.
`Well!' returned Scrooge, `I have but to swallow this, and be for the rest of my days persecuted by a legion of goblins, all of my own creation.
At this the spirit raised a frightful cry, and shook its chain with such a dismal and appalling noise, that Scrooge held on tight to his chair, to save himself from falling in a swoon.