scripture

(redirected from Scriptures)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

the devil can cite Scripture for his own purpose

Knowledge of Scripture does not necessarily equate to good intentions or correct moral positions, since biblical quotations can be manipulated or taken out of context to support nefarious acts or agendas. Just because he can quote the Bible doesn't mean his agenda is pure. The devil can cite Scripture for his own purpose.

the devil can quote Scripture for his own purpose

Knowledge of Scripture does not necessarily equate to good intentions or correct moral positions, since biblical quotations can be manipulated or taken out of context to support nefarious acts or agendas. Just because he can quote the Bible doesn't mean his agenda is pure. The devil can quote Scripture for his own purpose.

devil can quote Scripture for his own purpose

 and devil can cite Scripture for his own purpose
Prov. Evil people sometimes try to win the confidence of good people by quoting persuasive passages of Scripture.; Just because someone can quote Scripture to support his or her argument does not mean that the argument is virtuous. (Scripture usually refers to the Bible, but it can refer to other religious writings.) Sadie: Dad, you really ought to give me permission to go out with Nathan. He's such a polite boy, and he can even quote the Bible. Father: The devil can quote Scripture for his own purpose.
References in periodicals archive ?
The topic of Paul's use of the Old Testament is uniquely interesting because any scholar who explores this will also indirectly reveal his or her convictions and assumptions, sometimes stated but more often left unstated, pertaining to the doctrine of inspiration, the metaphysical involvement of God in history, the locus of authorial intent, the Christological linking (or lack thereof) of the canonical writings, and the metaphysics (and not merely literary qualities) underlying the doctrine of the different senses of Scripture. (5) Not surprisingly, the burgeoning scholarship on Paul's use of the Old Testament has largely avoided premodern accounts; if premodern accounts do appear, they do so often only to highlight the superiority of modern exegetical methods.
Many people were satisfied with "Hebrew Scriptures." The problem seemed solved.
There can be little doubt that Calvin's doctrine of Scripture is basic to his understanding of the Christian religion and the Christian life.
Rajan Zed, who is president of Universal Society of Hinduism, said that changing ancient Sanskrit scriptures to fit the commercial machine were likely to hurt the Hindu sentiments.
In their discussion of integration and psychopathology, Yarhouse, Butman, and McRay (2005) held that while the "Scriptures do offer instruction about the nature of our human condition before God and before one another" (p.
But it is not easy to find a definite reference to Purgatory in the Scriptures. However, it is there both in the Old and the New Testament, but rather by implication than by positive statement.
I would like you to consider the following Scripture: Gospel of John Ch 3:36 'He that believes in the Son has life and he that is not subject to the Son shall not see life, but the wrath of God abides upon him.'
For the fundamentalists the scriptures might be holy; those willing to shut out the rest of the world might be able to spend a lifetime picking through scriptural prophesies by chapter and verse ("Bible study," as it is called), but in comparison to the burgeoning frontier of discovery, invention, and innovation that was opening up in modern life, the Bible was becoming ever smaller, less reliable, and less interesting.
Red flags should go up when religious groups seek special classes for their holy scriptures.
Structured in the format of an imaginary series of letters from Biblical characters, With Skilful Hand adheres firmly to the content and meaning of the scriptures, carefully avoiding the temptation to embellish with unrecorded details, while creating a highly readable and smoothly flowing rendition that lay people can follow and enjoy as much as scholars.
he is named Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace." These lines from Isaiah 9:6 are some of the most recognizable of the scriptures we hear at Christmastime in the Catholic Church.
to meet the requirements of scriptures, and that includes the Talmud, I compiled about 44 critical issues and we do not comply with a single one of them." Nearly all Christians, however, reject the Talmud as having any authority.
Evangelicals do not speak with one voice on how to read their Scriptures (Bray, 1996).
Samuel Kobia, has cautioned faith communities against the use of holy scriptures to justify war.
His understanding of the centrality of Christ underlined the need to interpret the Scriptures with intelligence and precision.