schnorrer

(redirected from Schnorrers)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to Schnorrers: shul

schnorrer

A person who preys or overly depends upon another in a parasitic manner; a leech or sponge. From Yiddish. Sarah made a point of setting out on her own as soon as she finished high school, but her younger brother has been something of a perennial schnorrer. Every group of friends has at least one schnorrer. You know the type, the one who mooches drinks and food off everyone whenever you go out.

schnorrer

(ˈʃnorɚ)
n. a beggar; a person who sponges off of friends and relatives. (Yiddish.) Buy your own ciggies if you don’t like mine. Shnorrers can’t be choosers.
References in periodicals archive ?
Depicted as a schnorrer of not-too-moral character, he was accused of being paid to provide propaganda to missionaries in the East End.
[29] The Sephardic Jews' traditional sense of superiority is touched on in Children of the Ghetto (and is central to The King of Schnorrers); [30] as the early Central and East European immigrants became established, they in turn began to view with trepidation the large numbers of Jews from Poland and Russia who entered London in the 1880s.
There was even a play by Israel Zangwill, Le roi des schnorrers ("The King of Beggars")one would like to know what the Monegasques made of that.
Oring, a non-Jew, deftly arranges his chapter headings as a mosaic of Freud's preferred Jewish humor: schnorrers, schadchens, Fahrenheit (travel with horses and iron horses), and kuck (occult).
After more than a century, theater historian Edna Nahshon has discovered the original manuscript, as well as that of another unpublished Zangwill play, The King of Schnorrers, and the original version of The Melting Pot.
The truth is, and I hide this from everyone, all I have at my disposal is an army of schnorrers: I am nothing but the leader of boys, beggars and miserable journalists.
like Papa, Mama, the spinster aunts; the girl next door tumbling on the patterned rug, the schnorrers, the naughty shammas; like ...
With time, after his exposure to young Zionists at the Markenhof Lehrgut for hachshara, Otto came to view Yiddish as an authentic "Volkssprache" (vernacular)--at least, as he writes, "as long as it wasn't being spoken by peddlers!" (112) One of the sources of this attitude is the fact that the Zionist movement itself (at least until the 1930s) was viewed by many German Jews as suitable only for "ostjudische Schnorrer." The accusation of being "Schnorrer"--that is, spongers and freeloaders, appears often in Yekke discourse.