Scales


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Related to Scales: bathroom scales, Music scales, Minor scales

turn the scale(s)

To change the balance of a situation, such that one side or element is favored or gains advantage. The two candidates are so close in the polls that both are vying for something that will turn the scale in their favor. The immense interconnectivity of social media has turned the scales of power somewhat back into the hands of the ordinary population.
See also: turn

tilt the scale(s)

To change the balance of a situation, such that one side or element is favored or gains advantage. The two candidates are so close in the polls that both are vying for something that will tilt the scale in their favor. The immense interconnectivity of social media has tilted the scales of power somewhat back into the hands of the ordinary population.
See also: tilt

have scales fall from (one's) eyes

To suddenly be able to see a situation clearly and accurately. I used to be so in love with Andrew, but now that we've broken up, I've had scales fall from my eyes, and I can see how oafish he truly is! Once you start working somewhere new, it doesn't take long until you have the scales fall from your eyes, and you can see all of the problems of your "perfect" new job.
See also: eye, fall, have, Scales

thumb on the scale

A method of deception or manipulation that creates an unfair advantage for the swindler, likened to a merchant holding a thumb on the scale when weighing goods for sale, therefore increasing the weight and price. You have to suspect that the casinos have their thumb on the scale when it comes to the slot machines. There's no way you're getting fair odds.
See also: on, scale, thumb

bud scale

The hard, protective layer surrounding the buds of some plants. Oh, that's just a bud scale—your plant is fine.
See also: bud, scale

tip the balance

To upset the balance of a situation, such that one side or element is favored or gains advantage. The two candidates are so close in the polls that both are vying for something that will tip the balance in their favor. The immense interconnectivity of social media has tipped the balance of power somewhat back into the hands of the ordinary population.
See also: balance, tip

tip the scale(s)

To upset the balance of a situation, such that one side or element is favored or gains advantage. The two candidates are so close in the polls that both are vying for something that will tip the scale in their favor. The immense interconnectivity of social media has tipped the scales of power somewhat back into the hands of the ordinary population.
See also: tip

scale back

To minimize or reduce something in size or scope. A noun or pronoun can be used between "scale" and "back." With such a dramatic decrease in funding, we're going to have scale back on our project now.
See also: back, scale

scale up

1. To climb up something. How long do you think it will take us to scale up the mountain?
2. To increase something in size. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "scale" and "up." With this sudden increase in funding, we can finally scale up our research project! Can you scale up this drawing? I'd love to have a model to present to the board.
See also: scale, up

tip the scales at (something)

To weigh a certain amount. That fish you caught today tipped the scales at 21 pounds! I knew I needed to lose weight once I tipped the scales at 200 pounds.
See also: Scales, tip

tip the scales at something

to weigh a particular weight. Albert tips the scales at nearly 200 pounds. The champ weighed in and tipped the scales at 180.
See also: Scales, tip

tip the balance

Also, tip the scales; turn the scale. Offset the balance and thereby favor one side or precipitate an action. For example, He felt that affirmative action had tipped the balance slightly in favor of minority groups , or New high-tech weapons definitely tipped the scales in the Gulf War, or Just one more mistake will turn the scale against them. Shakespeare used turn the scale literally in Measure for Measure (4:2): "You weigh equally; a feather will turn the scale." The idioms with tip are much younger, dating from the first half of the 1900s.
See also: balance, tip

the scales fall from your eyes

LITERARY
If the scales fall from your eyes, you suddenly realise the truth about something after a long period of not understanding it or of being deceived about it. It was at that point that the scales finally fell from his eyes and he realised he had made a dreadful mistake. Note: This is a reference to the Bible story of Saul, who became blind after he had a vision of God on the road to Damascus. Saul became a Christian after Ananias, a follower of Jesus, restored his sight. The Bible says: `And immediately there fell from his eyes as it had been scales: and he received sight forthwith, and arose, and was baptized.' (Acts 9:18)
See also: eye, fall, Scales

tip the balance

or

tip the scales

COMMON If something tips the balance or tips the scales in a situation where two results seem equally likely, it makes one result happen or become much more likely. As the election approaches, the two main parties appear so evenly matched that just one issue could tip the balance. Years later, she still believed it had been Howe's warnings, not any love for her, that had finally tipped the scales against his leaving her for Lucy.
See also: balance, tip

the scales fall from someone's eyes

someone is no longer deceived.
In the Bible, this expression described how St Paul, blinded by his vision on the road to Damascus, received his sight back at the hand of God (Acts 9:18).
See also: eye, fall, Scales

tip (or turn) the scales at

have a weight of a specified amount.
See also: Scales, tip

tip (or turn) the scales (or balance)

(of a circumstance or event) be the deciding factor; make the critical difference.
See also: Scales, tip

the ˌscales fall from somebody’s ˈeyes

(literary) somebody finally understands the truth about something: It wasn’t until much later that the scales fell from his eyes and he realized that she’d been lying to him.In the Bible, this expression describes the moment when St Paul suddenly began to believe in Jesus and was able to see again.
See also: eye, fall, Scales

tip the ˈbalance/ˈscales

(also swing the ˈbalance) be the reason that finally causes somebody to do something or something to happen in one way rather than another: They were both very good candidates for the job but she had more experience and that tipped the balance.
See also: balance, Scales, tip

tip the scales at something

weigh a particular amount: He tipped the scales at just over 80 kilos.
See also: Scales, something, tip

scale back

v.
To reduce the scope or extent of something according to a standard or by degrees; reduce something in calculated amounts: The company scaled back the scheduled pay increase. After reviewing its budget, the school scaled its sports activities back.
See also: back, scale

scale up

v.
1. To climb up something; ascend something: The hikers scaled up the side of the mountain.
2. To increase the scope or extent of something according to a standard or by degrees; increase something in calculated amounts: The company scaled up its operations to meet the growing demand. The city scaled its efforts up to reduce crime.
See also: scale, up

tip the scales

1. To register weight (at a certain amount).
2. To offset the balance of a situation.
See also: Scales, tip
References in periodicals archive ?
On the scales of Instructor Support (Preferred m=4.
The first 24 tracks on the CD are major scales played at MM of 60-100 BPM, which could be helpful for some one needing to practice with a model.
Empirical relationships derived from either microenvironment- or macroenvironment-level scales must be relevant at the scales at which vector control interventions are applied.
The most basic are how big can you scale and how does this compare to the target environment.
Researchers agree, for instance, that while the theory produces good predictions when viewed on a scale from microbes to whales, the theory is rife with exceptions when it's applied to animals that are relatively close in temperature and size.
However, a combination of a gradient design with field and laboratory experiments can be a powerful approach for the initial phases of indicator development, but as the indicator is applied at larger spatial scales or in uncharacterized sites, additional approaches are needed.
The Piers-Harris Self-Concept Scale (Harris & Piers, 1969) measured student reported self-concept with a pretest to posttest design.
It is also worth mentioning that the use of rotary feeders for dosing both pressure and vacuum scales can offer advantages over the more traditional rotary screws and vibratory feeders, because they effectively prevent flushing.
That is to say, it is an architecture in which the functional requirements are underpinned by qualities of space that come from a reading of the context, scale and possible materials that set a poetic and a clarity to the space which offers ease of use.
First, Ballou overstates the risk to value-added assessment that comes from the question of whether or not scales can be developed with equal intervals.
Because of the high ``price'' to teachers of pushing students on to higher level, more complex thinking by testing them on such questions, many teachers opt instead for ``safe'' 90-80-70 scales, and questions that will generate a corresponding distribution of scores.
Items are rated on four point Likert-type scales that do not allow for neutral responses, with total scores computed by summing across items and higher scores reflecting greater satisfaction.
A systematical analysis of animal and poultry production costs and benefits on different scales and in different regions of China will help provide insight on the following issues:
com announces that a new market research report is available in its catalogue: Global Patient Scales Industry http://www.