salad

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salad years

A carefree time of youthful innocence, ingenuousness, and inexperience. A variant of the more common "salad days," which itself is taken from Shakespeare's Antony and Cleopatra. I had a few encounters with truly romantic love back in my salad years, before I graduated; now, however, I think love is largely an elaborate delusion. Whenever I ask my grandfather the meaning of a word I hear on TV, he always laughs and says he'll tell me when I'm no longer in my salad years.
See also: salad, year

fruit salad

rude slang A disparaging term for a homosexual man (as is "fruit").
See also: fruit, salad

salad days

A youthful, carefree time of innocence and inexperience. The phrase comes from a line in Shakespeare's Antony and Cleopatra: "My salad days, when I was green in judgment, cold in blood." Ah, to be in love during your salad days, such blissful and carefree times. Whenever I ask my grandfather the meaning of a word I hear on TV, he always laughs and says he'll tell me when I'm no longer in my salad days.
See also: days, salad

in one's salad days

Fig. in one's youth. (Usually formal or literary. Comparing the greenness of a salad with the greenness, or freshness and inexperience, of youth.) I recall the joys I experienced on school vacations in my salad days. In our salad days, we were apt to get into all sorts of mischief on the weekends.
See also: days, salad

toss a salad

to mix various salad ingredients together. The chef tossed the salad. I tossed the salad just before my guests arrived.
See also: salad, toss

salad days

The time of youth, innocence, and inexperience, as in Back in our salad days we went anywhere at night, never thinking about whether it was safe or not . This expression, alluding to the greenness of inexperience, was probably invented by Shakespeare in Antony and Cleopatra (1:5), when Cleopatra, now enamored of Antony, speaks of her early admiration for Julius Caesar as foolish: "My salad days, when I was green in judgment, cold in blood."
See also: days, salad

your salad days

LITERARY
If you talk about your salad days, you mean the time when you were young and had little experience. The Grand Hotel did not seem to have changed since her salad days. Note: This is a quotation from Shakespeare's `Antony and Cleopatra' (Act 1, Scene 5), when Cleopatra is talking about her youth: `My salad days, When I was green in judgment'.
See also: days, salad

your salad days

1 the period when you are young and inexperienced. 2 the peak or heyday of something.
This is a quotation from Shakespeare's Antony and Cleopatra. Cleopatra is commenting on her previous relationship with Julius Caesar: ‘My salad days, When I was green in judgement, cold in blood To say as I said then!’
See also: days, salad

your ˈsalad days

(old-fashioned) the time when you are young and do not have much experience of life: Back in my salad days my friends and I used to go dancing every Saturday night.This comes from Shakespeare’s play Antony and Cleopatra.
See also: days, salad

salad days

A time of youthful inexperience and carefree pleasures, usually looked back on with nostalgia. The phrase came from Shakespeare's Anthony and Cleopatra, in which the Queen of the Nile reflected on “My salad days / When I was green in judgment: cold in blood . . .”
See also: days, salad
References in classic literature ?
When the old witch heard of the fine salad she wanted to eat it, and said, 'Dear countryman, just let me taste the wonderful salad.
Now the servant came into the kitchen, and when she saw the salad standing there ready cooked she was about to carry it up, but on the way, according to her old habit, she tasted it and ate a couple of leaves.
When he came there he saw the two donkeys running about in the courtyard, but the salad was lying on the ground.
I just wish I was a rich American and could spend my summer at a hotel and wear jewels and low-necked dresses and have ice cream and chicken salad every blessed day.
Within the pail were three slices of turkey, two slices of cold tongue, some lobster salad, four slices of bread and butter, a small custard pie, an orange and nine large strawberries, and some nuts and raisins.
Blythe, or if she imagined that he was still as infatuated with her as he might have been in his salad days, it was surely their duty to put the matter before her in another light.
There were only the old housekeeper and her handmaiden in the house, so that on the plea of not giving too much trouble I could indulge what my other half calls my fantaisie dereglee as regards meals-- that is to say, meals so simple that they could be brought out to the lilacs on a tray; and I lived, I remember, on salad and bread and tea the whole time, sometimes a very tiny pigeon appearing at lunch to save me, as the old lady thought, from starvation.
I tried to appease him by offering him the whole of my salad and toast supper which stood ready at the foot of the little verandah steps when we came back, but nothing appeased that Man of Wrath, and he said he would go straight back to the neglected family.
Madam, I dare you to smile until you suffer this test: Let the Marechal Niel roses that Percy brought you on the night you gave him your heart be served as a salad with French dressing before your eyes at a Schulenberg
Sapsea then proposes a hit at backgammon, which, seasoned with his own improving conversation, and terminating in a supper of cold roast beef and salad, beguiles the golden evening until pretty late.
When Saxon had served the beans, and Billy the coffee, she stood still a moment and surveyed the spread meal on the blankets--the canister of sugar, the condensed milk tin, the sliced corned beef, the lettuce salad and sliced tomatoes, the slices of fresh French bread, and the steaming plates of beans and mugs of coffee.
What do you say, when our county member, growing hot, at cheese and salad time, about the spread of democracy in England, burst out as follows: "If we once lose our ancient safeguards, Mr.
A bit of fish,' said John to the cook, 'and some lamb chops (breaded, with plenty of ketchup), and a good salad, and a roast spring chicken, with a dish of sausages and mashed potatoes, or something of that sort.
and as I notice the lettuce Ma mentioned, on the table, I'll make the salad.
Bella playfully setting herself about the task, Mrs Wilfer's impressive countenance followed her with glaring eyes, presenting a combination of the once popular sign of the Saracen's Head, with a piece of Dutch clock-work, and suggesting to an imaginative mind that from the composition of the salad, her daughter might prudently omit the vinegar.