sailor

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curse like a sailor

To use profanities or vulgar language very freely or frequently. (An allusion to the rough language presumed to be used by navy personnel.) My little sister has been cursing like a sailor ever since she started college. My granny is the sweetest old lady you'll ever meet, but she curses like a sailor when she gets to talking about someone or something she doesn't like.
See also: curse, like, sailor

cuss like a sailor

To use profanities or vulgar language very freely or frequently. (An allusion to the rough language presumed to be used by navy personnel.) My little sister has been cussing like a sailor ever since she started college. My granny is the sweetest old lady you'll ever meet, but she cusses like a sailor when she gets to talking about someone or something she doesn't like.
See also: cuss, like, sailor

have the mouth of a sailor

To have a tendency or proclivity to use coarse, rude, or vulgar language. I don't know what you're letting your son watch on television, but, for a fifth grader, he sure has the mouth of a sailor! My grandmother is the sweetest old lady you'll ever know, but, my lord, does she have the mouth of a sailor!
See also: have, mouth, of, sailor

heaven protects children, sailors, and drunken men

proverb A phrase used to explain how these vulnerable groups are able to avoid harm. Of course heaven protects children, sailors, and drunken men—how do you think Billy's managed to avoid hurting himself when he rides his bike so recklessly?
See also: and, drunken, heaven, men, protect

language that would make a sailor blush

Very profane language. (An allusion to the rough language presumed to be used by military personnel.) My grandmother was the sweetest lady you'd ever meet, but boy howdy could she use language that'd make a sailor blush!
See also: blush, language, make, sailor, that

like a drunken sailor

In an unrestrained, feckless, and frivolous manner. Usually used in reference to spending money. He always starts spending money like a drunken sailor right after he gets paid, then struggles to cover his rent and bills toward the end of the month.
See also: drunken, like, sailor

mouth of a sailor

A tendency or proclivity to use coarse, rude, or vulgar language. I don't know what you're letting your son watch on television, but, for a fifth grader, he sure has the mouth of a sailor! My grandmother is the sweetest old lady you'll ever know, but, my lord, does she have the mouth of a sailor!
See also: mouth, of, sailor

red sky at night, sailor's delight

proverb A red sky at sunset is a sign that good weather will follow. The full phrase is "Red sky at night, sailor's delight; red sky in the morning, sailor's warning." I think we're going to have a nice sunny day tomorrow. Just look at that gorgeous sunset—red sky at night, sailor's delight!
See also: delight, red, sky

spend like a sailor (on (shore) leave)

To spend excessively, extravagantly, or wastefully. Now don't go spending like a sailor on shore leave just because you got a bit of a tax refund from the government. The local council has been spending like sailors on this new tram project, while other existing public transport goes into disrepair. Every time my husband's paycheck comes through, he goes out to the pubs and spends like a sailor on leave!
See also: like, sailor, spend

spend money like a drunken sailor

To spend money freely and frivolously. He always starts spending money like a drunken sailor right after he gets paid, then struggles to cover his rent and bills toward the end of the month.
See also: drunken, like, money, sailor, spend

swear like a sailor

To use profanities or vulgar language very freely and fluently. (An allusion to the rough language presumed to be used by military personnel.) My little sister has been swearing like a sailor ever since she started learning bad words. My granny is the sweetest old lady you'll ever meet, but she swears like a sailor when she gets on the topic of something or someone she doesn't like.
See also: like, sailor, swear
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

like a drunken sailor

With no restraint. A merchant seaman on shore leave with months' worth of pay in his pocket tended to make up for lost time in the drinking and “play-for-pay romance” departments. Fiscal restraint was out of the question. So did miners and cowboys when they too had a chance to go to town, but the image of a sailor prevailed. The sea shanty “What Shall We Do with the Drunken Sailor?” suggests the same idea of a jocular attitude toward an inebriated mariner.
See also: drunken, like, sailor
Endangered Phrases by Steven D. Price Copyright © 2011 by Steven D. Price
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References in classic literature ?
"Bravo!" repeated the sailors. And they all looked with astonishment at this man whose eye now disclosed an intelligence and his body a vigor they had not thought him capable of showing.
"How about that?" and he turned toward the sailors who had by this time picked themselves from the ground, none of them much the worse for his experience except the fellow who had been the cause of it, and who would doubtless nurse a sore shoulder for a week or so.
"That is true!" said the sailors, ashamed of their weakness.
She had hoped before she voiced her sentiments that it would not be necessary for her to enter into the transaction at all, for she believed that Clayton was amply able to cope with every emergency, but she had to admit that so far at least he had shown no greater promise of successfully handling the situation than any of the others, though he had at least refrained from adding in any way to the unpleasantness, even going so far as to give up the tin to the sailors when they objected to its being opened by him.
Then D'Artagnan perceived that all his men, with remarkable intelligence, had already travestied themselves into sailors, more or less ill-treated by the sea.
But just that instant the officer turned to leave Lord and Lady Greystoke, and, as he did so, tripped against the sailor and sprawled headlong upon the deck, overturning the water- pail so that he was drenched in its dirty contents.
"Here it is, sir," and the sailor took from his coat a handkerchief, tied at each corner.
The entire ship's crew were undergoing a nervous excitement, of which I can give no idea: they could not eat, they could not sleep--twenty times a day, a misconception or an optical illusion of some sailor seated on the taffrail, would cause dreadful perspirations, and these emotions, twenty times repeated, kept us in a state of excitement so violent that a reaction was unavoidable.
The first thing that the harpooner, aged nineteen, and the sailor, aged seventeen, did to show that they were men was to behave like men.
The ape-man had been about to read a note that one of the sailors had handed him as the small boat that bore him to the shore was on the point of returning to the steamer, but at the hail from the vessel's deck he looked up.
and O., blond Northmen from a Swedish barque, Japanese from a man-of-war, English sailors, Spaniards, pleasant-looking fellows from a French cruiser, negroes off an American tramp.
Miners and sailors came back from the North with wonderful stories and pouches of gold.
Oaths a-plenty.) Azore Sailor ( Dancing.) Go it, Pip!
I would not draw lots however, and in the night the sailor whispered to Helmar again and again, and I sat in the bows with my clasp-knife in my hand, though I doubt if I had the stuff in me to fight; and in the morning I agreed to Helmar's proposal, and we handed halfpence to find the odd man.
The only person present with a noticeably dark complexion was a tall man in a pilot coat, and a round hat, who looked like a sailor. Could this be one of them in disguise?