Rome was not built in a day

Rome wasn't built in a day

proverb Major undertakings are not completed all at once. A: "I've been working on my thesis all day and only wrote three pages." B: "Well, Rome wasn't built in a day."
See also: built, Rome
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

Rome was not built in a day.

Prov. It takes a lot of time to achieve something important. Professor: When will you finish your research project? Student: It'll take me a while. Rome wasn't built in a day, you know.
See also: built, not, Rome
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Rome was not built in a day

People say Rome was not built in a day to point out that it takes a long time to do a task properly, and you should not rush it or expect to do it quickly. Only two people I interviewed were charitable about the new government. `Rome wasn't built in a day,' one man said `Let's give them more time.' These things take time. Rome wasn't built in a day, you know.
See also: built, not, Rome
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

Rome was not built in a day

a complex or ambitious task is bound to take a long time and should not be rushed.
This warning against rashness and impatience has been current in English since the mid 16th century.
See also: built, not, Rome
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

Rome was not built in a day

Be patient; major achievements take time. This expression was already a proverb in the late twelfth century, and then appeared in two famous English proverb collections of the sixteenth century, Richard Taverner’s (1539) and John Heywood’s (1546). The saying is still current.
See also: built, not, Rome
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
As one analyst concluded, "We should recall that Rome was not built in a day, and note in the context of the Gulf monarchies that reform from above is still a far preferable route to change than revolution from below." (30)