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hot rod

An automobile that has been specially refitted, redesigned, or altered in some way so as to achieve very high speeds and acceleration. I've spent nearly two years turning this old worn-out Mustang into one heck of a hot rod.
See also: hot, rod

kiss the rod

To accept punishment passively. As a child, I always found it best to just kiss the rod—arguing with my parents always made the situation worse.
See also: kiss, rod

lightning rod

Something or someone that becomes the focus of others' criticism or blame. Primarily heard in US. The CEO became a lightning rod for criticism when his company laid off a third of its employees.
See also: lightning, rod

square rod

A measure of land equal to roughly 25 square miles. I need a measurement of the available land in square rods, please.
See also: rod, square

stick to beat (someone or something) with

Something, often a mishap or misdeed, that is used as an excuse for criticism. Even the slightest mistake by Stan was enough to give the boss a stick to beat him with.
See also: beat, stick

make a rod for (one's) own back

To cause problems for oneself in the future by doing something in the present that is ill advised. Primarily heard in UK. I'm telling you, if you don't get some more exercise now, you'll be making a rod for yourself when you get older.
See also: back, make, own, rod

rule with a rod of iron

To rule, govern, or control a group or population with complete power over all aspects of life, work, etc. He rules with a rod of iron, and moves swiftly to gain control over any entity that is not already in his grasp. She has ruled this company with a rod of iron for three decades, and it's going to be difficult for her to let go of control.
See also: iron, of, rod, rule

a rod in pickle

obsolete A punishment or retaliation kept in store for future use. The prime minister insisted that Britain had a rod in pickle for any nation that dared encroach upon its sovereign borders in force.
See also: pickle, rod

spare the rod and spoil the child

If you avoid disciplining your child for behaving badly, they will never grow out of that bad behavior and will become spoiled as a result. I just think it's crazy that Susan and Jonathan let their children dictate the terms of the house like that. They have got to lay down the law—spare the rod and spoil the child.
See also: and, child, rod, spare, spoil

rain stair-rods

old-fashioned To rain extremely heavily. Primarily heard in UK. We've been preparing for this match for weeks, but I heard it's going to be raining stair-rods tomorrow. We were looking forward to sunny skies in Portugal, but it rained stair-rods the whole time we were there.
See also: rain

rule with an iron rod

To rule, govern, or control a group or population with complete, typically tyrannical authority over all aspects of life, work, etc. A noun or pronoun can be used between "rule" and "with." He rules with an iron rod, and moves swiftly to gain control over any entity that is not already in his grasp. She has ruled this company with an iron rod for three decades, and it's going to be difficult for her to let go of control.
See also: iron, rod, rule

spare the rod and spoil the child.

Prov. You should punish a child when he or she misbehaves, because if you do not, the child will grow up expecting everyone to indulge him or her. Jane: How can you allow your little boy to be so rude? Ellen: It distresses me to punish him. Jane: lean understand that, but spare the rod and spoil the child.
See also: and, child, rod, spare, spoil

hot rod

An automobile modified to increase its speed and acceleration, as in Kids love to tinker with cars and try to convert them into hot rods. [Mid-1900s] Also see hopped up.
See also: hot, rod

spare the rod and spoil the child

Discipline is necessary for good upbringing, as in She lets Richard get away with anything-spare the rod, you know. This adage appears in the Bible (Proverbs 13:24) and made its way into practically every proverb collection. It originally referred to corporal punishment. It is still quoted, often in shortened form, and today does not necessarily mean physical discipline.
See also: and, child, rod, spare, spoil

a lightning rod for something

mainly AMERICAN
If someone is a lightning rod for something such as anger or criticism, they are the person who is naturally blamed or criticized by people, although there are other people who are responsible. She has become a lightning rod for criticism of the administration. He told the Palermo court he was an innocent lightning rod for Italy's many crime problems. Note: You can also just call someone a lightning rod. She was the party's chief manager, star campaigner and also its lightning rod. Note: A lightning rod is a long metal strip, one end of which is fixed on the roof of a building, with the other end in the ground to protect the building from being damaged by lightning.
See also: lightning, rod, something

make a rod for your own back

BRITISH
If you make a rod for your own back, you do something which will cause you many problems in the future. You're making a rod for your own back, you know, letting the child into your bed at night. You'll never get her to stay in her own bed now. Note: Verbs such as create are sometimes used instead of make. In a way, the company's success has created a rod for its own back, for the style is copied everywhere. Note: This expression refers to someone providing the stick with which they themselves will be beaten.
See also: back, make, own, rod

spare the rod and spoil the child

People say spare the rod and spoil the child, to mean that if you do not punish a child severely when the child behaves badly, their behaviour will become worse. Kids needed authority figures — spare the rod and spoil the child. Note: People sometimes just say spare the rod. We believe in discipline. We don't spare the rod.
See also: and, child, rod, spare, spoil

kiss the rod

accept punishment meekly or submissively.
This idiom refers to a former practice of making a child kiss the rod with which it was beaten. It is used by Shakespeare in Two Gentlemen of Verona: ‘How wayward is this foolish love That, like a testy babe, will scratch the nurse And presently all humbled kiss the rod’.
See also: kiss, rod

make a rod for your own back

do something likely to cause difficulties for yourself later.
See also: back, make, own, rod

a rod in pickle

a punishment in store.
In pickle means ‘preserved ready for future use’. This form, which dates from the mid 17th century, has superseded an earlier mid 16th-century variant a rod in piss .
See also: pickle, rod

rule someone or something with a rod of iron

control or govern someone or something very strictly or harshly.
This expression comes from Psalm 2:9: ‘Thou shalt break them with a rod of iron; thou shalt dash them in pieces like a potter's vessel’.
See also: iron, of, rod, rule, someone, something

spare the rod and spoil the child

if children are not physically punished when they do wrong their personal development will suffer. proverb
See also: and, child, rod, spare, spoil

a rod/stick to ˈbeat somebody with

a fact, an argument, etc. that is used in order to blame or punish somebody: The results of the national exams this year are being used as another stick to beat teachers with.
See also: beat, rod, somebody, stick

make a rod for your own ˈback

do something which is likely to cause problems for yourself, especially in the future: I think she’s making a rod for her own back by not telling him she’s leaving. When he finds out, there’ll be trouble.
See also: back, make, own, rod

rule (somebody/something) with a rod of ˈiron/with an iron ˈhand

(informal) control somebody/something in a very strong or strict way: They ruled the country with an iron hand and anybody who protested was arrested.
See also: hand, iron, of, rod, rule

ˌspare the ˈrod and ˌspoil the ˈchild

(saying) if you do not punish a child for behaving badly, he/she will behave badly in future
See also: and, child, rod, spare, spoil

(hot) rod

n. a car that has been customized for power and speed by the owner. My rod’ll outrun yours any day.
See also: hot, rod

rod

verb

lightning rod

n. someone, something, or an issue that is certain to draw criticism. Why write such a boastful introduction to your book. I will just be a lightning rod for criticism.
See also: lightning, rod

rod

1. n. a gun; a revolver. (Underworld.) I got a rod in my pocket. Don’t move.
2.  Go to (hot) rod.

wrinkle-rod

n. the crankshaft of an engine. A wrinkle-rod’ll set you back about $199, plus installation charges, of course.

rule with an iron hand/rod, to

Stern or tyrannical rule. This term comes from Tyndall’s translation of the Bible (1526): “And he shall rule them with a rodde of yron.” It was later transferred to any kind of stern domination, either serious or ironic. For the latter, Anthony Trollope used it in Barchester Towers (1857): “In matters domestic she . . . ruled with a rod of iron.” See also iron hand (in a velvet glove).
See also: hand, iron, rule

spare the rod and spoil the child

Discipline makes for a good upbringing. This warning appears in the Bible (“He that spareth his rod hateth his son: but he that loveth him chasteneth him betimes,” Proverbs 13:24), and is repeated in numerous subsequent proverb collections. Although today we frown on corporal punishment, the term persists, the rod now usually signifying discipline in a looser sense. Stanley Walker, who delighted in mixing metaphors and clichés, wrote: “He never spared the rod or spoiled the broth” (The Uncanny Knacks of Mr. Doherty, 1941).
See also: and, child, rod, spare, spoil
References in periodicals archive ?
He actually built the rods for his first order on the tailgate of his pickup.
'Hence, the Philippines has been importing its nuts and bolts, wires, nails, welding rods, springs and even paper clips, staple wire and many other wire-rod-based products, while all these can actually be locally produced if only the Philippines had wire-rod manufacturing,' Yao said.
SteelAsia investing P25 billion for Philippine's first wire rod mills !-- -- Louella Desiderio (The Philippine Star) - October 23, 2018 - 12:00am MANILA, Philippines Steel firm SteelAsia Manufacturing Corp.
"If a rod doesn't perform, project costs and hours can quickly add up.
He said the increased import price is due to the weakening of the taka against the dollar, the higher transport cost due to restriction on overloading, and congestion at the Port, has contributed to the hike of rod prices.
But I had a fly rod with me - so I set it up and was soon into a nice fish that saved the day.
Now, if you've snapped the blank your rod is for all intents and purposes KIA.
The control rod assembly has transverse vibration under flow excitation.
Rods Gone Wild is a sole proprietorship with Bob Boisvert at the helm.
UNiD Patient-Specific Cervical Rods are available in two alloys (Titanium TA6V ELI/Cobalt Chromium) and in a single-diameter (3.5mm) or dual-diameter options (3.5mm transitioning to either 5.5mm or 6.0mm).
When split cane rods were overtaken by glass fibre rods and then rods of carbon fibre, the close relation with a rod seemed to disappear.
One of Rods songs 'And I Love You' heralded the mourners into the chapel and another, and possibly the one he will be most remembered for, 'Curly', was heard during the service.
THERE ARE STILL SOME M249 MACHINE SUN OPERATING RODS IN THE HELP THAT HAVE THE TOWER PORTION/REAR PART WELDED TO THE TUBE.
Rod fixation has several advantages: small size of one-sided vehicles, light weight, comfortable for patients, minimal risk of damage to neurovascular structures during the rods, a small amount of suppurative complications due to the high stability of rods (Korzh, Talus, and Ryndenko, 1987; Ryndenko and Bets, 1990; Furdyuk, 1992).
"I used to make cane and graphite fishing rods, and tie flies as a hobby when l was on the street," said Jeremy Loyd, an Arrowhead prison inmate.