ringer

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Related to Ringers: Ringers solution, Ringtones

be a dead ringer for

To bear a strong resemblance to someone or something else. People sometimes ask Susie for her autograph because she is a dead ringer for Kate Winslet.
See also: dead, for, ringer

dead ringer

A person or thing that bears a strong resemblance to someone or something else. Susie was such a dead ringer for Kate Winslet that sometimes people would ask her for her autograph.
See also: dead, ringer

dead ringer for (someone)

A person or thing that bears a strong resemblance to someone or something else. Susie was such a dead ringer for Kate Winslet that sometimes people would ask her for her autograph.
See also: dead, for, ringer

look like a (dead) ringer for (someone)

To bear a strong resemblance to someone; to look exactly like someone else. People sometimes ask Susie for her autograph because she looks like a ringer for Kate Winslet. Wow, you look like a dead ringer for my cousin Martin—it's actually really eerie!
See also: for, like, look, ringer

put (someone or something) through the ringer

To force someone or something to endure harsh treatment or criticism. A misspelling of "put (someone or something) through the wringer." Often used in passive constructions. After years of rigorous use, I've really put this old truck through the ringer. Wow, I'm glad that interrogation is over—they put me through the ringer.
See also: put, ringer, through
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

*(dead) ringer (for someone)

Fig. very closely similar in appearance to someone else. (*Typically: be ~; look like ~.) You are sure a dead ringer for my brother. Isn't he a ringer for Chuck?

look like a (dead) ringer

(for someone) Go to a (dead) ringer (for someone).
See also: like, look, ringer
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

dead ringer

A person or thing that closely resembles another; an exact counterpart. For example, Brian's a dead ringer for his Dad, or That red bike is a dead ringer for Mary's. [Late 1800s]
See also: dead, ringer
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

a dead ringer for someone

INFORMAL
COMMON If you say that one person is a dead ringer for another, you mean that the first person looks or sounds exactly like the second. He's tall, dark and a dead-ringer for Robert Pattinson. Kovic is extraordinary in one respect: he's a dead ringer for the former US President. Note: The word `ringer' may originally have come from a name for dishonest traders at fairs who sold brass rings, pretending they were gold. In American horse racing, a `ringer' is a horse that has been dishonestly substituted for another in a race.
See also: dead, for, ringer, someone
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

a dead ˈringer for somebody

(informal) a person who looks extremely like somebody else: She’s a dead ringer for her mother.A ringer was a person or thing that pretended to be another person or thing. In horse racing for example, a ringer was a horse that was substituted for another in order to cheat in a race.
See also: dead, for, ringer, somebody
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

(dead) ringer (for someone)

n. someone who is an exact duplicate of someone else. (see also ringer.) You are sure a dead ringer for my brother.
See also: dead, for, ringer, someone

dead ringer

verb
See also: dead, ringer

ringer for someone

verb
See also: for, ringer, someone

ringer

verb

ringer

n. the obvious choice; the one identical to the one you have; the best match; the best match for one’s needs; the most likely choice. (see also (dead) ringer (for someone).) That’s the best horse racing today. It’s a ringer if I ever saw. one.
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

dead ringer

A person or object that exactly resembles another, an exact counterpart in appearance. The usage of “ringer” for look-alike has been around since the late 1800s, when it was used for a horse that was fraudulently substituted for another in a race. It also was applied to the person who made such a substitution, but this usage has died out. However, in 1891 the term was made more emphatic with the addition of “dead,” here used in the sense of “exact,” as it is in dead heat for an exact tie.
See also: dead, ringer
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer

put through the ringer

Subjected to a harsh scolding or punishment. Before washing machine spin cycles, excess water was squeezed out of hand-washed laundry by means of a wringer mounted on an agitator-type washing machine or a sink. The device was composed of two cylinders set close together and turned by a hand crank. Being put through the wringer could be hard on delicate clothing, and being put through the metaphorical wringer, such as being chewed out by your boss, isn't much fun either.
See also: put, ringer, through
Endangered Phrases by Steven D. Price Copyright © 2011 by Steven D. Price
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References in periodicals archive ?
This has been part of the Ringing Remembers national initiative to remember those ringers who died, and to recruit 1,400 new ringers to ensure this great tradition is carried on.
The ringers killed were the young bell captain, Bruce Davies, 29, his brother Max, 24, blacksmith David Legge, hay-cutter and deputy bell leader William Thomas, 28, and Daniel Rees, 35, a farmer who died in the influenza epidemic that followed the war.
The appeal from the two parish churches is for people to join in the project and become a bell ringer today in and Bernard Smith on 01509 768099 are contacts for anyone wishing to; have more information.
"One hundred years ago bell ringers across the country caught and amplified the national mood as four years of war came to an end.
Alan said the shortage of bell ringers reflected the decline in numbers involved in church matters in general.
They will join Merseyside's own musicians, the Maghull Parish Handbell Ringers, who were formed in 1983.
Mr Tallis was then put in touch with Nicola, when he soon realised that not only had the church not been officially requested to provide a wedding peal, but that ten ringers were actually needed.
The First Days of School: How to Be an Effective Teacher, suggests bell ringers as one of a teacher's strategies in classroom management.
Some of Birmingham's historic parishes could stay eerily silent over Easter because of a desperate shortage of experienced church bell ringers.
BELL ringers at Liverpool Cathedral will be making a huge noise today, as they attempt to break a world record that has stood for more than 100 years.
So with typical flamboyance, he hired handbell performers from Lancashire, England, put them in costumes and called them Swiss Handbell Ringers. People paid him a pretty penny to see this "curiosity."
An extensive history of the towers, bells and ringers of St Mary's Cathedral from 1820 to 2004.
For the now documentary Ringers: Lord of the Fans, a roughly chronological chronicle of the pop-cultural impact of J.R.R.
An army of about 23 bell ringers began ringing in the holiday season and working eight-hour shifts at Eugene stores the weekend before Thanksgiving.