right to work

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right to work

1. noun The right of anyone who wants to work to not be prevented from obtaining employment. They can't block you from applying for that job—you have the same right to work as anyone else!
2. adjective Relating to laws that prohibit employers from requiring their employees to join a union. Often hyphenated. Primarily heard in US. They can't bully you into joining a union—that's what right-to-work laws are for.
See also: right, work
References in periodicals archive ?
From 2000-10, real personal incomes grew by an average of 24.3% in the 22 right-to-work states, more than double the rate for the other 28 as a group.
The absence of right-to-work laws makes employment a less pleasant experience for those forced to join a union against their will, so at the margin, some persons might choose to simply not work (to be sure, not an option for many persons given the dominant importance of labor income).
Supporters of right-to-work statutes tend to be anti-collectivist, libertarian wannabes who elevate personal choice to iconic status, and are willing to be paid less and accept substandard benefits in return for the right not to have to join a big, bad workers' collective.
The next Part discusses a trade-off, nationalized "right-to-work," which presumably benefits the business community.
* For Montana Nurses-Bureau of Labor Statistics data shows that Montana RNs make more than RNs in three of the four neighboring right-to-work states.
The tendency of newer automotive component companies to settle in right-to-work states worries the UAW particularly.
"The only thing Right-to-Work laws give you is the right to work for less money."
Ben- nett, an economist at George Mason University, "In states without right-to-work laws, high taxes and the high cost of living erode the purchas- ing power of income." On average, he says, families in states with right-to-work laws are better off.
The significance of right-to-work laws as a deterrent to membership, however, is open to dispute.
The right-to-work movement began at the state level as a response to organized labor's ability to secure maintenance-of-membership guarantees during World War II.
The last State to enact a right-to-work law was Louisiana, in 1976.
Blue Water Restaurant, in Silver Street, was served a civil penalty referral notice warning that a financial penalty of up to PS20,000 per illegal worker found will be imposed unless the employer can demonstrate that appropriate right-to-work document checks were carried out, such as seeing a passport or Home Office document confirming permission to work.
When this is implemented, it is a so-called "agency shop." The "right-to-work" law aims to make such agency shops and the withholding of dues from non-union members illegal.
The attorney general's office writes ballot titles for initiatives, and the one it crafted for the right-to-work proposal was plainly tilted against it.