red herring

(redirected from Red herrings)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial.
Related to Red herrings: Red herring fallacy

red herring

Something irrelevant that diverts attention away from the main problem or issue. The candidate used the minor issue as a red herring to distract voters from the corruption accusations against him. The mystery writer is known for introducing red herrings to arouse the reader's suspicion of innocent characters.
See also: herring, red

red herring

a piece of information or suggestion introduced to draw attention away from the real facts of a situation. (A red herring is a type of strong-smelling smoked fish that was once drawn across the trail of a scent to mislead hunting dogs and put them off the scent.) The detectives were following a red herring, but they're on the right track now. The mystery novel has a couple of red herrings that keep readers off guard.
See also: herring, red

red herring

Something that draws attention away from the central issue, as in Talking about the new plant is a red herring to keep us from learning about downsizing plans . The herring in this expression is red and strong-smelling from being preserved by smoking. The idiom alludes to dragging a smoked herring across a trail to cover up the scent and throw off tracking dogs. [Late 1800s]
See also: herring, red

a red herring

COMMON If something is a red herring, it takes people's attention away from the main subject, problem, or situation that they should be considering. All the fuss about high pay for public employees is a bit of a red herring. The really serious money is to be found in private companies. A sighting of the missing woman in London turned out to be a red herring. Note: A red herring is a herring that has been soaked in salt water for several days, and then dried by smoke. Red herrings were sometimes used when training dogs to follow a scent. They were also sometimes used to distract dogs from the scent they were following during a hunt.
See also: herring, red

a red herring

something, especially a clue, which is or is intended to be misleading or distracting.
This expression derives from the former practice of using the pungent scent of a dried smoked herring to teach hounds to follow a trail (smoked herrings were red in colour as a result of the curing process).
See also: herring, red

a red ˈherring

a fact, etc. which somebody introduces into a discussion because they want to take people’s attention away from the main point: Look, the situation in French agriculture is just a red herring. We’re here to discuss the situation in this country.This idiom comes from the custom of using the scent of a smoked, dried herring (which was red) to train dogs to hunt.
See also: herring, red

red herring

A diversionary tactic; a false or deliberately misleading trail. This expression comes from the use of strong-smelling smoked herrings as a lure to train hunting dogs to follow a scent. They also could be used to throw dogs off the scent, and it was this characteristic that was transferred to the metaphoric use of red herring. “Diverted from their own affairs by the red herring of foreign politics so adroitly drawn across the trail,” wrote W. F. Butler (Life of Napier, 1890).
See also: herring, red

red herring

A misleading clue. Many people who know the phrase believe it came from the practice of game poachers laying scents of smoked herring (smoking accounted for the fish's reddish color) to throw gamekeepers and their dogs off the poachers' scent. However, etymologists discount that explanation, favoring instead that the phrase originated with an English writer who used the scent-laying image as a metaphor for a particular political plan. Mystery writers, readers, and critics use “red herring” to describe a piece of plotting intended to throw the reader off in deducing who-done-it. The financial world uses the phrase to mean a stock prospectus, not from any intent to deceive, but because the document has a red cover.
See also: herring, red
References in periodicals archive ?
Red Herring is dedicated to following SeedLegals path to further success and innovation.
Yottaa is very honored to be named a Red Herring 100 Award winner for 2016, especially since we competed against 1,200 other emerging technology companies, said Bob Buffone, Founder and Chief Technology Officer, Yottaa.
“Selecting startups that show the most potential for disruption and growth is never easy,” said Alex Vieux, publisher and CEO of Red Herring. “We looked at hundreds and hundreds of candidates from all across the continent, and after much though and debate, narrowed the list down to the Top 100 Winners.
Paul Titt of the Red Herrings team was runner-up with five fish weighing 1.14kg and as he scooped the most fish pool pounds 115 came his way.
- IF you want to know the meanings of the title phrases, buy the book, Red Herrings And White Elephants, by Albert Jack (John Blake, pounds 9.99).
Yottaa, the leading SaaS acceleration platform for eCommerce, today announced it has been selected as a finalist for Red Herrings Top 100 North America award, a prestigious list honoring the years most promising private technology ventures from the North American business region.
Red Herring has been selecting the most exciting and promising start-ups and scale ups since 1995.
This unique assessment of potential is in addition to a review of the companys actual track record and standing, which allows Red Herring to see past the buzz and make the list a valuable instrument for discovering and advocating the greatest business opportunities in the industry.
[UKPRwire, Sat Apr 29 2017] Red Herring announced its Red Herring Europe award winners this evening at the Top 100 forum, recognizing Europes leading private companies and celebrating these startups innovations and technologies across their respective industries.