Received Pronunciation


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Received Pronunciation

An accent of British English derived from that of the British upper class in the early 20th century. It is commonly used in public broadcasting, as well as in schools such as Oxford and Cambridge. If you want people to take you seriously, you need to lose your country accent and adopt the Received Pronunciation. Studying at Cambridge has caused me to start speaking in the Received Pronunciation.
See also: received
References in periodicals archive ?
It is not risky to affirm that Received Pronunciation, the "accent-less" variety, the BBC English, is the one that Spanish students of English feel more comfortable with (amongst British varieties).
[a] between the "a" in American Network Standard (NS) "can't" and in standard American "father"; the "a" in British Received Pronunciation (RP) "can't"
While the Received Pronunciation in England calls up thoughts of royalty, elegance, and privilege, Ebonics stirs images of the problems of urban life - poverty, crime, unemployment, substandard housing, inferior education.
The 'special sense' which Ellis serves to illustrate is accordingly made plain: 'received pronunciation, the pronunciation of that variety of British English widely considered to be least regional, being originally that used by educated speakers in southern England; also, the "accepted" standard pronunciation of any specified area.' Characterized by both non-localized status and its affiliations with a social elite ('the highest status British English accent', as Trudgill records,(2) the 'one accent not connected with a specific locality, though .
Received pronunciation (74%), Northern Irish (70%) and Southern Irish (70%) rounded off the top four.
It is best read with a Geordie accent, not Home Counties received pronunciation.
People ranked the Yorkshire accent as the most intelligent, followed successively by "received pronunciation" - the Queen's English - silence and finally the Birmingham accent.
ere were several projects with the versatile American actor Edward Norton - such as the rened RP, or "received pronunciation," that he deployed in "e Painted Veil."
The topics include a historical study of voice onset time in received pronunciation, the origin and function of the grapheme combination qu in English, words denoting kingdom in Layamon's Brut, female animals in fables by Robert Henryson and Biernat of Lublin, a synopsis of the main approaches to semantic change in linguistics through the 19th and 20th centuries, and the linguistic situation in Kenya according to Labov's social factors.
As story driven as any JRPG that's gone before it (with a fairly predictable, world-saving tale to boot), it also features a wonderful cast of English voice actors, ranging from Mancunian drunks to sly, posh "received pronunciation" villains.
On the third, I can't help but point out these moments of received pronunciation and she looks startled.
Labouff identifies three dialects used by professional singers: American Standard, the neutral pronunciation used for North American repertoire; Received Pronunciation (both historic and modern), used for repertoire by composers of the British Isles; and Mid-Atlantic Dialect, a hybrid of North American and British diction used in European works that are not specifically British.
On TV and radio we're used to hearing newsreaders using Received Pronunciation (RP), which was formerly known as Queen's English, or sometimes BBC English.
All sorts of Birmingham-accented successful, intelligent, rich and famous people have come to the rescue and the positive spin is that some accents, notably Yorkshire, are associated with more intelligence than received pronunciation, so you don't have to sound like David Cameron or Tony Blair any more to be a winner.
He says: 'The Doctor is a scientist and an intellectual and a lot of people seem to think you can only be those things if you speak with Received Pronunciation which, of course, is rubbish.'
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