ram

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hydraulic ram

A type of water pump in which the natural flow of water is periodically redirected upward into a pipe and reservoir. A: "Why can't I get any water out of this thing?" B: "Hmm, maybe the hydraulic ram isn't working."
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milk the ram

old-fashioned To engage in an activity or enterprise that has no chance of succeeding; to do something pointless or futile. (A ram is a male sheep and cannot be milked.) I don't know why you bother arguing with him. You're just milking the ram if you think you're going to change his mind. Everyone told us we were milking the ram when we set up our online store during the infancy of the Internet, but now we're one of the most successful companies in the world.
See also: milk, ram

ram (something) down

1. To force something down into or through something else. He tried ramming a stick down the pipe to clear the blockage, but it ended up getting stuck in there. Don't ram the plug into the socket like that—you could electrocute yourself! The government has come under fire for ordering prison staff to ram food down the hunger strikers' throats.
2. To cram or pack something down by pounding it forcefully. No matter how hard I ram these clothes down, I just can't get the suitcase to close shut. Don't ram the soil down like that, or the seed won't be able to sprout properly.
3. To force something to topple over by pounding into it. Police were forced to ram the suspect's door down after he refused to cooperate. We'll have to ram this part of the wall down with the bulldozer.
4. To force, compel, or attempt to make someone accept, endure, consider, or agree with or to something. Always followed by "(one's) throat." I hate going to my friend's house because his husband's always ramming political rhetoric down my throat. Look, I'm just browsing around for a car, quit trying to ram one down my throat!
See also: down, ram

ram (something) down (one's) throat

1. To compel or physically force one to swallow an object. I hate how doctors try to ram pills down your throat for even the tiniest of colds. The only way to get the dog to take his medication is to ram it down his throat.
2. To force, compel, or attempt to make one accept, endure, consider, or agree with or to something. I hate going to my friend's house, because her husband's always ramming political rhetoric down my throat. Look, I'm just browsing around for a car, quit trying to ram one down my throat!
See also: down, ram, throat

ram (something) home

To make something extremely clear; to make someone understand or realize something, especially through forceful repetition. (Can also be constructed as "ram home (something).") Primarily heard in UK. John rams their financial difficulties home whenever his wife suggests they buy something new. She's need to ram home the fact that she was clear of all charges before the election began.
See also: home, ram

ram in

To force something to penetrate or become lodged in something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "ram" and "in." He rammed a metal rod in the computer terminal in a fit of blind rage. The serial killer grabbed his victim's head and rammed in a knife.
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ram into (someone or something)

1. To collide with someone or something, especially with a very sudden and forceful impact. Another driver ignored a red light and rammed into us in the middle of the intersection. He didn't see the dining room table and rammed right into it.
2. To cause something to collide with someone or something, especially with a great and sudden force. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "ram" and "into." The toddler rammed the shopping cart into the man's thigh. The criminal rammed his car into the truck carrying the bank deposits.
3. To force something to penetrate or become lodged in something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "ram" and "into." He rammed a metal rod into the computer terminal in a fit of blind rage. The serial killer rammed the knife into the back of his latest victim.
See also: ram

ram through

1. To crash through something. The attackers rammed through the gates of the castle with a statue they had torn down in the courtyard. The driver lost control of his car and rammed through the wall of a building.
2. To force something to penetrate through something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "ram" and "through." He rammed a metal rod in the computer terminal in a fit of blind rage. The serial killer rammed the knife in the back of his latest victim.
3. To crash something into and through something else. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "ram" and "through." He rammed a metal rod in the computer terminal in a fit of blind rage. The serial killer rammed the knife in the back of his latest victim.
4. To force something to pass through some decision-making process or group, especially faster than is typical or proper. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "ram" and "through." They're trying to ram the legislation through Congress before the midterm elections. You can't just ram this application through the committee, Tom. We need time to look over it in detail.
See also: ram, through
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

ram into someone or something

to crash into someone or something. Mary accidentally rammed into a fence as she rode along. The car rammed into the tree and was totally wrecked.
See also: ram

ram something down

to pack something down by pounding, as with a ram. The worker used a pole to ram the earth down and pack it tight. The worker rammed down the earth.
See also: down, ram

ram something into someone or something

 and ram something in
to pound something into someone or something. He rammed his fist into Bill's side and shouted something angry at him. He rammed in his fist.
See also: ram

ram something through

 (something)
1. to force something through something. He rammed his fist through the window, cutting himself in the process. Harry put the brick up to the window glass and rammed it through. Next time he would remember his key.
2. to force something through a deliberative body, usually not allowing due consideration. They rammed the bill through the city council. The President was unable to ram the measure through Congress.
See also: ram, through

ram through something

to crash or pound through something. The car rammed through the back of the garage. I was afraid that the truck would ram through the fence.
See also: ram, through

shove someone or something down someone's throat

 and ram someone or something down someone's throat; force someone or something down someone's throat 
1. Lit. to force someone to swallow something. The harsh nurse forced the medicine down the patient's throat. The zookeepers rammed the food down the python's throat.
2. Fig. to force someone to accept something. Don't try to force that car down my throat! I don't want it! You can't force that nonsense down my throat! I don't want any more insurance, and I don't want anyone to shove any insurance down my throat. Mary isn't invited to my party, and I don't wish for anyone to ram her down my throat!
See also: down, shove, throat
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ram down someone's throat

Also, shove down someone's throat. Compel to accept or consider, as in That salesman tried to ram a life insurance policy down my throat, or She has a way of shoving her political views down your throat. These terms transfer forcing one to swallow something to forcing acceptance of an object or idea.
See also: down, ram, throat
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ram something down someone's throat

INFORMAL
COMMON If someone rams facts or opinions down your throat, they force you to listen to them and try to make you accept them. I can't understand why we're trying to ram Shakespeare down their throats when they haven't got a basic education in reading and writing. Note: Verbs such as shove, force, and cram are sometimes used instead of ram. You get religion shoved down your throat as soon as you're born in this place. I cannot force my beliefs down the throats of my staff.
See also: down, ram, something, throat
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

ram something ˈhome

(especially British English) force somebody to understand something important: The terrible injuries I saw in that accident really rammed home for me the importance of wearing seat belts.
See also: home, ram, something

ram, force, thrust, etc. something down somebody’s ˈthroat

(informal) try to make somebody accept or believe an idea or belief by talking about it all the time: I’m tired of having her opinions rammed down my throat all the time!He was always forcing Marxist theories down our throats.
See also: down, something, throat
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

ram down

v.
1. To break something down by pounding with or as if with a ram: The attacking army rammed down the fortress wall using a huge log. The truck rammed the tree down.
2. To force the passage or acceptance of something into something: The plumber rammed the plunger down the pipe.
See also: down, ram
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ram something down someone’s throat

tv. to force something upon someone. (Not literal.) Don’t try to ram that nonsense down my throat.
See also: down, ram, something, throat
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

ram

/shove down (someone's) throat Informal
To compel to accept or consider: always ramming his political opinions down my throat.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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