rainbow

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always chasing rainbows

Constantly pursuing something more appealing than what one currently has—no matter how unrealistic it is. You can't be always chasing rainbows your whole life—you need to pick a stable career and start being an adult. You won't find a better girlfriend than Tia. Why are you always chasing rainbows?
See also: always, chase, rainbow

at the end of the rainbow

Said of something that is appealing but seemingly illusive or very hard to obtain. Yeah, I highly doubt you're going to find a raise at the end of the rainbow when you meet with your boss today.
See also: end, of, rainbow

be chasing rainbows

To be constantly pursuing things that are unrealistic or unlikely to happen. You can't always be chasing rainbows your whole life—you need to pick a stable career and start being an adult.
See also: chase, rainbow

chase a rainbow

To pursue some goal or accomplishment that is utterly unrealistic or unlikely to happen. I know you'd love to be an actress, but instead of chasing a rainbow for the rest of your life, why not to pick a stable career and start being an adult? It feels like the government is chasing a rainbow in its efforts to overhaul the tax legislation.
See also: chase, rainbow

chase rainbows

To pursue goals that are unrealistic, fanciful, or unlikely to happen. You can't chase rainbows your whole life—you need to pick a stable career and start being an adult.
See also: chase, rainbow

chasing rainbows

Constantly pursuing things that are unrealistic or unlikely to happen. You can't always be chasing rainbows your whole life—you need to pick a stable career and start being an adult.
See also: chase, rainbow

life isn't all rainbows and unicorns

Real life does not just consist of innocent, carefree happiness; there is more hardship or suffering in reality than one realizes. I know it's ugly having to see someone you cared about betray you like that, but life isn't all rainbows and unicorns. Friends who aren't parents themselves will have a harder time realizing that life isn't all rainbows and unicorns when you have a new baby in the house.
See also: all, and, life, rainbow, unicorn

life isn't all sunshine and rainbows

Real life does not just consist of innocent, carefree happiness; there is more hardship or suffering in reality than one realizes. I know it's ugly having to see someone you cared about betray you like that, but life isn't all sunshine and rainbows. Friends who aren't parents themselves will have a harder time realizing that life isn't all sunshine and rainbows when you have a new baby in the house.
See also: all, and, life, rainbow, sunshine

rainbows and unicorns

Innocent, carefree happiness. Often used in negative constructions to indicate the opposite. I know it's ugly having to see someone you cared about betray you like that, but life isn't all rainbows and unicorns. We love our daughter to bits, but things aren't all sunshine and rainbows when you're living with a newborn.
See also: and, rainbow, unicorn

somewhere over the rainbow

In distant or future place, usually where things are thought to be better. A reference to the song of the same name from the 1939 film The Wizard of Oz. I guess I'm an eternal optimist, but I think it's always possible that our deepest desires are going to be fulfilled somewhere over the rainbow.
See also: over, rainbow, somewhere

the end of the rainbow

That which is greatly desired but is exceptionally difficult or elusive to achieve or obtain. I spent my whole college life thinking a cushy job like this was the end of the rainbow, but now that I have it, I'm feeling fairly disenchanted. After such a long legal battle, we're just happy to know that there will be a bit of closure at the end of the rainbow.
See also: end, of, rainbow
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

always chasing rainbows

tending to look for something (more) exciting and (more) rewarding but without realistic expectations. He can't seem to settle down and enjoy life. He's always chasing rainbows.
See also: always, chase, rainbow
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

the end of the rainbow

If you say that something is the end of the rainbow, you mean that it is something that you would very much like to get or achieve it, although in reality this will be very difficult. For all these teams, Wembley was the elusive prize, the end of the rainbow. Note: You can also say that something is at the end of the rainbow. There's a great big prize at the end of the rainbow and we both want it. Compare with a pot of gold. Note: There is an old legend that a pot of gold is buried at the point where the end of the rainbow meets the ground.
See also: end, of, rainbow

be chasing rainbows

If someone is chasing rainbows, they are wasting their time by trying to get something which they can never have. My teachers told me I'd never make it as an actor and that I was just chasing rainbows
See also: chase, rainbow
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

at the end of the rainbow

used to refer to something much sought after but impossible to attain.
This phrase refers to the story of a crock of gold supposedly to be found by anyone who succeeds in reaching the end of a rainbow.
See also: end, of, rainbow

chase rainbows (or a rainbow)

pursue an illusory goal.
See also: chase, rainbow
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

rainbow

n. a bowlegged person. (Also a rude term of address.) Ask that rainbow if he has to have special trousers made.
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

chasing rainbows

Pursuing illusionary goals, trying to achieve impossible things. The term comes from the old tale about finding a crock of gold if one digs at the end of the rainbow, where it touches earth. The idea of chasing rainbows as equivalent to a fruitless quest was expressed in the nineteenth century; those who did so were called “rainbow chasers.” A popular song, “I’m Always Chasing Rainbows,” with words by Joseph McCarthy and music by Harry Carroll (based on Chopin’s C-sharp minor Fantasy Impromptu), was published in 1918. It was used in several motion pictures, among them Ziegfeld Girl, with Judy Garland, and was revived with considerable success in 1946.
See also: chase, rainbow
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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