quince

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Related to Quinces: Quinceanera, quiches

get on (one's) quince

To irritate or annoy one. Primarily heard in Australia. Boy, you are really getting on my quince today. Why can't you just do what I ask without arguing about it?
See also: get, on, quince

get on someone's quince

irritate or exasperate someone. Australian informal
See also: get, on, quince
References in periodicals archive ?
The one unusual addition I'm adding here is, as you'll have noticed, quince.
EDIBLE quince, cydonia oblonga, is a small, deciduous thornless, irregular shaped tree up to 12ft high.
Families can discover and taste a huge variety of produce, ranging from the little-known quince and medlar to pears and 12 different varieties of English apple.
Add 3 cups of water, tomato paste, quinces, lime juice, prunes, and potatoes.
Quinces keep well if stored cool, dry and frost-free.
But the Chinese quince is destined to remain a loner,.
They are delicious stewed and baked - in fact, almost everything you can do with apples you can do with quinces. They need a similar amount of cooking time and, as with apples, add sugar only after the fruit begins to soften and change colour (quince flesh turns pink).
Quinces have a mythical reputation for stirring up trouble.
Quinces are in the market, fragrant, knobbed like breasts.
Turkey is one of the motherlands and native spreading areas of quince (Ozbek, 1978; Tekintas et al.
Y desde mucho antes se empiezan a tener en cuenta cada detalle que hara especial esa ocasion, como por ejemplo, indico Salcedo, el atuendo que lucira la noche de sus quinces. Muchas de las ninas suenan con lucir un vestido muy sexy, otras buscan un estilo mas tradicional, pero cuando se trata de vestido, todas quieren lucir como una "Cenicienta" no importando el modelo ni el diseno.
unsalted butter 1 cup drained Poached Quinces (at right) 1.
Quinces, in the town's High Street, is being run by an American woman and supplied by a Mid Wales farmer's wife.
Quinces have been a feature of Persian cooking for the last two and a half millennia, and they have long been naturalised throughout southern Europe.
Quinces can be trained to a single trunk, or can be grown as a bush.