Queer Street


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Queer Street

Shaky on one's feet. This British phrase originally meant to have fallen on hard financial times. It was appropriated by the American prizefighting community to describe a boxer who, having been knocked down, stands up slowly, and wobbles on rubbery legs while wondering, “Who am I and where am I?”—such a pug is on Queer Street.
See also: queer, street
References in periodicals archive ?
Although our approach has always been to be inclusive, with Queer Street we had been attempting to do something that was more reclaimed for the LGBT community - to say this is a gay space.
Mr Barton said he had not ruled out the idea of Queer Street reopening in some form, either in Birmingham or another city.
Never say never, if we wanted to use Queer Street again we would use it," he said.
Andrew Norris, for the bar's owners, says: "It is denied that the Queer Street name and logo give rise to a likelihood of deception in the minds of the relevant public.
Mr Barton said: "We announced the refurbishment of the bar and are now happy to officially unveil it as Queer Street.
The name ties in with the history of the bar's sister business, The Nightingale, which had a Queer Street night many years ago.
All change: The Queer Street sign is deleivered and, left, where the venue sits in Hurst Street.
It's worth thinking about Wittgenstein because he, a gay man who was arguably the 20th century's greatest philosopher, is one of the many ghosts who haunts McCourt's Queer Street and who seems to have inspired its uncommon, arresting structure.
McCourt mentions both Wittgenstein and Benjamin numerous times in Queer Street, and it seems clear that his book is modeled on Benjamin's effort to construct a new kind of history.
Jaquie Lawrence, commissioning editor for Queer Street, Channel 4's late- night gay and lesbian programmes, said: "From British television, you wouldn't know what lesbians did in bed.
The disconnect between those of us who were witness to old-school gay society and those who have come to maturity in an age of pride is one of the many subjects of the you-can't-dam-this-stream-of-consciousness prose of James McCourt in his lavishly enjoyable book Queer Street.
There are some others, though, who could be in Queer Street if they don't find finance soon.
Queer Street The Rise and Fall an American Culture 1947-1985, James McCourt (Norton, $27.
While sizing up the queer streets of San Francisco's Castro District for his latest film, Milk--the story of slain gay rights activist Harvey Milk, expected to hit theaters in late 2008--indie auteur Gus Van Sant was asked his opinion of the City by the Bay.
Backward Glances: Cruising the Queer Streets of New York and London