QED

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QED

An initialism of quod erat demonstrandum (Latin for "what was to be demonstrated"), formally used at the conclusion of mathematical or philosophical proofs. In everyday speech and writing, it is used to emphasize that something proves a particular point or opinion. If the company's profits have gone up while their operating costs have gone down, then they have the money to pay their employees a better wage—QED.
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

ˌQEˈD

that is what I wanted to prove and I have proved it: He can’t have done it. The bank was robbed at 6.30 and he was with me at the time. QED.This is an abbreviation of a Latin phrase, quod erat demonstrandum, meaning which was to be demonstrated.
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017
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References in periodicals archive ?
I'd heard about a collection of Stein's work that had recently been issued, which included Q.E.D., Fernhurst, and The Making of Americans (all of which have roots in 1903).
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