proof


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110 proof

Extremely strong or potent. Its original sense refers to the alcohol content of liquor. This cleanser is 110 proof. If it can't get the stain out, nothing can.
See also: 110, proof

bulletproof

1. adjective Resilient or impervious to bullets, as of fabric or other material. That bulletproof vest saved my life!
2. adjective Resistant to mishandling, abuse, damage, error, or malfunction. Don't worry about breaking the phone, these new models are bulletproof! We've developed a bulletproof computer program that even the most non-computer-savvy person will be able to use!
3. adjective Extremely well planned or thought out, such as to be impervious to criticism or failure. We have a bulletproof plan for tackling poverty in the neighborhood. My thesis proposal is absolutely bulletproof.
4. verb To make resilient or impervious to bullets, as of fabric or other material. After crime rates rose in the city, many stores began bulletproofing their windows and doors.
5. verb To make resistant to mishandling, abuse, damage, error, or malfunction. Don't worry about breaking the phone, these new models have been totally bulletproofed! We've bulletproofed our latest computer program so that even the most non-computer-savvy person will be able to use it!
6. verb To plan or think something out so well as to be impervious to criticism or failure. Make sure you bulletproof your plan before you submit it to the developers. I spent an extra two weeks totally bulletproofing my doctoral thesis.

burden of proof

The requirement and obligation of providing sound, reasonable evidence supporting a charge or allegation. Originating and used primarily in law, it can be applied more broadly to any situation in which a contentious dispute arises. In court, the burden of proof always rests on the plaintiffs and the prosecutors. The burden of proof is on you to show that the computer was broken before you bought it.
See also: burden, of, proof

put to the proof

To be tested, or to test something. I'm hopeful that the invention will now finally work properly, but it needs to be put to the proof first.
See also: proof, put

the proof of the pudding

The final results, which are the only way to judge something's quality or veracity. Our analysts think that the marketing campaign will reinvigorate our sales, but the proof of the pudding will be in our year-end figures.
See also: of, proof, pudding

be living proof of (something)

To serve as an example for why a particular statement or concept is true. As a former slacker, I know that you can turn your life around if you work hard enough—I'm living proof of that.
See also: living, of, proof

be living proof that

To serve as an example for why a particular statement or concept is true. As a former slacker, I'm living proof that anyone can turn their life around with some hard work and dedication.
See also: living, proof, that

proof positive

Proof that definitively confirms something; undeniable proof (of something). This document—signed by the defendant—is proof positive that he authorized the transfer of funds. If you're looking for proof positive, you're not going to find it. Some things just don't have a definite answer.
See also: positive, proof

the proof is in the pudding

The final results of something are the only way to judge its quality or veracity. Our analysts think that the marketing campaign will reinvigorate our sales, but the proof is in the pudding, so let's see how our figures look at the end of the year. OK, if I did everything right, the engine should work right, but the proof will be in the pudding.
See also: proof, pudding

the proof of the pudding is in the eating

The final results are the only way to judge something's quality or veracity. Our analysts think that the marketing campaign will reinvigorate our sales, but the proof of the pudding is in the eating, so let's see how our figures look at the end of the year. OK, if I did everything right, the engine should work right, but the proof of the pudding will be in the eating.
See also: eating, of, proof, pudding

carded

Asked to show one's ID to prove that they are legally old enough to be in a particular place or doing a specific thing. I'm 30 years old, but I look so young that I get carded all the time. We'll never be able to get into the bar without being carded!
See also: card

get proofed

To be asked to show official identification, such as a driver's license, to verify that one is above the legal age of majority, usually when trying to purchase alcohol or enter an age-restricted place. I can't believe I got proofed when we were out to dinner—it must be because I shaved my beard. We were all waiting to show our fake IDs to the bouncer, but none of us got proofed as we went into the club.
See also: get, proof

proofed

Asked for official identification, such as a driver's license, to verify that one is above the legal age of majority, usually when trying to purchase alcohol or enter an age-restricted place. I can't believe I got proofed when we were out to dinner—it must be because I shaved my beard. We were all waiting to show our fake IDs to the bouncer, but none of us were proofed as we went into the club.
See also: proof

proof (one)

Asked for official identification, such as a driver's license, to verify that one is above the legal age of majority, usually when trying to purchase alcohol or enter an age-restricted place. I can't believe the waiter proofed me when we were out to dinner—it must be because I shaved my beard. We were all waiting to show our fake IDs to the bouncer, but he didn't proof any of us as we went into the club.
See also: proof

goof-proof

1. verb To make something difficult to ruin or spoil. With all the mishaps so far, I see that you guys didn't exactly goof-proof this plan, huh?
2. adjective Describing something that has been made difficult to ruin or spoil. With all the mishaps so far, I see that your brilliant plan isn't exactly goof-proof, huh?
3. adjective Describing something that is difficult to misuse or make a mistake with. Clear nail polish is goof-proof—I don't trust myself to paint my own nails with anything else!

proof is in the pudding

Prov. You cannot be sure that you have succeeded until you have examined the result of your efforts. Jill: I think we've done a good job of fixing the lawn mower. Jane: Well, the proof is in the pudding. We haven't tried to mow the lawn with it yet.
See also: proof, pudding

The proof of the pudding is in the eating.

Prov. You don't know the quality of something until you have tried it or experienced it. Theory says that this material will produce a superior widget, but the proof of the pudding is in the eating.
See also: eating, of, proof, pudding

burden of proof

Obligation of proving a disputed charge or allegation. For example, Are you sure you mailed the tax return on time? The burden of proof's on you. A legal term dating from the late 1500s, it has also been used more loosely in recent times.
See also: burden, of, proof

proof of the pudding, the

Results are what count, as in Let's see if this ad actually helps sales-the proof of the pudding, you know. The full expression of this proverb, dating from about 1600, is The proof of the pudding is in the eating, but it has become so well known that it is often abbreviated.
See also: of, proof

the proof of the pudding is in the eating

People say the proof of the pudding is in the eating to mean that something can only be judged to be good or bad after it has been tried or used. Such therapies should not be dismissed out of hand, particularly when the proof of the pudding is in the eating. Note: People often vary this expression, for example by just talking about the proof of the pudding. The proof of the pudding, so to speak, will be if sales of English cheese go up. Note: In this expression, `proof' means the testing of something rather than establishing that it is true. The idea is that the best way to test the quality of a pudding is to taste it rather than admire its appearance.
See also: eating, of, proof, pudding

be (the) living proof that (or of)

show by your or something's existence and qualities that something is the case.
See also: living, proof, that

the proof of the pudding is in the eating

the real value of something can be judged only from practical experience or results and not from appearance or theory.
Proof here means ‘test’, rather than ‘verification’. A garbled version of the expression, the proof is in the pudding , is often heard, no doubt abbreviated for the sake of convenience.
1998 Nigella Lawson How to Eat Don't hide the fact that you're microwaving it: they do say the proof of the pudding is in the eating.
See also: eating, of, proof, pudding

be ˌliving ˈproof of something

show something is true simply by being alive or existing: He plays tennis and golf. He’s living proof that a heart attack doesn’t mean the end of an active life.
See also: living, of, proof, something

the proof of the ˈpudding (is in the ˈeating)

(saying) you can only say something is a success after it has actually been tried out or used: I know you didn’t think it was a very good product, but just look at the fantastic sales figures. That’s the proof of the pudding.
Proof in this idiom refers to a way of testing something.
See also: of, proof, pudding

proof ˈpositive

definite or convincing proof: It’s proof positive of her belief in the company that she’s investing her own money in it.
See also: positive, proof

carded

and proofed
mod. [of an ID card] examined to determine whether one has reached the legal drinking age. Dave got carded at the party even though he is thirty and looks it. As soon as we were proofed, we got in and got some brews.
See also: card

proofed

verb
See carded
See also: proof

drool-proof

mod. can withstand idiots who drool. (Of well-written software that even droolings idiots can operate without crashing.) This software package is drool-proof. Even my grandmother could use it.

goof-proof

1. mod. foolproof; not subject to misuse. This scheme is not goof-proof, but it’s pretty sound.
2. tv. to make something foolproof; to take action to see that something cannot be misused. See if this can be goof-proofed by Monday evening.

burden of proof, the

The obligation to support a contention by presenting adequate evidence. The term is a translation of the Latin onus probandi and was used in English courts of law from the late sixteenth century on. Transferred to any situation in which there was an obligation to prove something, it became a cliché in the nineteenth century. Attorney-novelist Scott Turow used it as the title for a popular novel involving a suicide and lawsuit (1990).
See also: burden, of

proof of the pudding is in the eating, the

Performance is the only valid test. This proverbial expression of quality control dates from about 1600, appearing in print in William Camden’s Remains Concerning Britain (1605). It has been repeated many times over the centuries, particularly by British writers (including George Bernard Shaw and W. Somerset Maugham), for whom pudding is more of a basic dish than it is to Americans (it originally meant a kind of sausage, and later any food inside a crust); the Economist entitled a survey of the advertising industry “Proof of the Pudding” (June 1990). The term, generally shortened to “proof of the pudding,” survives on this side of the Atlantic as well.
See also: of, proof, pudding
References in periodicals archive ?
Having produced ten musicals at the theatre over the three years since opening, Proof will be the first in-house play at Hope Mill.
However, although alternative blockchains may offer better scalability and economics, they cannot offer the strongest levels of proof. The robustness of the Bitcoin blockchain is without peer, and it is likely that Bitcoin blockchain proofs will gain wider legal acceptance than those stored on secondary blockchains.
Marsh (https://www.marsh.com/us/media/marsh-collaborates-with-ibm-acord-and-isn-to-apply-blockchain-technology-for-first-commercial-proof-of-insurance.html) announced in April the first (https://www.insurancejournal.com/news/national/2018/04/16/486525.htm) commercial proof of insurance blockchain product in conjunction with IBM, with input from insurance standards organization ACORD and customer feedback from ISN, a contractor and supplier information management firm.
GMG customers operate multi-node digital proofing systems less than 1 AE to each other, every day on every proof, anywhere in the world, says Welch.
Milo Sensors' Proof wristband will be available sometime this year.
Nowadays, proof has been assigned a more prominent place in the mathematics curriculum at all levels.
But on September 29, 1813, the first stone was laid for the city's first public proof house in Banbury Street.
The letter said that FEMA has "reportedly maintained" that the extension of the proof of loss deadline did not affect the statute of limitations.
Moreover, an appropriate picture or diagram can be used as a visual proof of some geometric property or theorem.
Proof Lab was born in 2004, when Will Hutchinson and Nate McCarthy teamed up to build their dream hometown shop.
When a teacher discusses a geometry proof problem in class, it generally involves oral presentation of a formal proof and body movements pointing at different parts of the figure of the problem.
Full Proof products (70 -8.0 proof) maintain a commanding share of the Total Rum category.
Muscat, April 9 (ONA) Events of the 5-day training programme on the audit proof evidences to be executed by the State's Financial and Administrative Audit Institution (SFAAI) in the audit and accounts apparatuses and diwans in the AGCC states under the patronage of the expert Hamad bin Abdullah bin Salim al-Rashdi, Director General of Audit on the Ministries and Service Units sector.
The 80 proof original and 60 proof flavored vodkas are available for $10.99 for a 750 ml bottle.
The Wrexham Proof of Age Scheme will not issue any further 18+ Proof of Age Cards after Monday, September 6.