prisoner

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take no prisoners

1. Literally, to leave nobody alive on a battlefield. The marauders were notorious for taking no prisoners.
2. By extension, to be utterly ruthless, uncompromising, or unyielding in the pursuit of one's agenda or goal. This business is renowned for being cutthroat. The people who succeed here take no prisoners. The new manager doesn't take any prisoners when a project needs to get done.
See also: no, prisoner, take

prisoner of conscience

Someone imprisoned for their political or religious beliefs or actions associated therewith. The winner of the Nobel prize was a prisoner of conscience for nearly 12 years, whose writing in that time helped bring an end to legal discrimination against his religion. The two prisoners of conscience were arrested for using social media to condemn the actions of the dictatorship.
See also: conscience, of, prisoner

take no prisoners

 
1. Lit. to kill the enemy rather than seize the enemy as prisoners. The soldiers' orders were to take no prisoners.
2. Fig. to be extremely ruthless with the opposition. The new manager takes no prisoners. He is ruthless and stern.
See also: no, prisoner, take

take no prisoners

or

not take any prisoners

JOURNALISM
If someone takes no prisoners or does not take any prisoners when they are carrying out a plan or an action, they do it in a very forceful and determined way, without caring if they harm or upset other people. Neil is rough and aggressive; he takes no prisoners. She'd learned the hard way not to take any prisoners. She went in there with an agenda, and she wasn't prepared to make any compromises. Note: You can also say that someone has a take-no-prisoners attitude or approach to something. We had a take-no-prisoners attitude, and we didn't care who we upset. Note: This expression refers to the practice of killing enemy soldiers rather than keeping them as prisoners.
See also: no, prisoner, take

prisoner of conscience

a person detained or imprisoned because of their religious or political beliefs.
This phrase is particularly associated with the campaigns of Amnesty International, a human-rights organization.
See also: conscience, of, prisoner

take no prisoners

be ruthlessly aggressive or uncompromising in the pursuit of your objectives.
1998 Times The transition from Formula One to front-wheel drive saloon cars was never going to be easy…especially in a series where drivers are not known for taking prisoners.
See also: no, prisoner, take

take no ˈprisoners

be extremely aggressive and show no sympathy for other people in trying to achieve your aims: She took no prisoners in her dealings with the unions.Her take-no-prisoners approach has been remarkably successful.
See also: no, prisoner, take

take no prisoners

1. To kill all of an enemy or a population.
2. To be ruthless or unrestrained, as in an undertaking: "Grandmother was both very pretty and very mouthy. She took no prisoners" (Nicki Giovanni).
See also: no, prisoner, take
References in periodicals archive ?
On many occasions jail administration seized drugs and mobile in fake search operations and tortured the prisoners brutally, Abdul Waheed and others told.
Pakistan released 146 Indian prisoners on good will gesture on January 8, spokesperson added.
Corazon Aquino (February 1986-June 1992): 400 prisoners (an average of 70 prisoners/year)
By identifying prisoners as the 'civil dead', Anderson highlights the degree to which incarceration and disenfranchisement strip prisoners of citizenship, arguing that radio both addresses the issues and reconnects prisoners to democracy.
Department of Justice Bureau of Justice Statistics' bulletin, Prisoners in 2002 the average military prisoner was male (97 percent), white (61 percent), a high school graduate (99 percent) and most likely committed a crime against a person (38 percent).
It added that an inspection force entered section 18 while the prisoners were praying and demanded them to immediately stop the prayers, but prisoners refused, which angered the administration, considering them breaking the rules, and immediately announced a state of alert throughout the prison.
Prisoners in Al Ramallah Prison sent an official letter via a lawyer urging Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas to get personally involved.
The newspaper earlier this month interviewed prisoner Ayman Al-Hamoud, who said that many prisoners are registered at the Hebrew University.
Unsuitable prisoners include prisoners in Category A or on the escape list; unconvicted and convicted un-sentenced prisoners; prisoners subject to extradition proceedings and sentenced prisoners who are remanded on further charges or awaiting sentence for further convictions.
However, most of the prisoners left behind as the jail flooded had not been convicted of any crime, but were being held pre-sentencing.
A week later Cheney resurfaced in the news to describe the humane treatment of prisoners at Gitmo, stating that they are well fed and well treated.
According to a June 2002 study by the US Department of Justice, as many as two-thirds of prisoners will be rearrested within three years of their release.
The court noted that adoption of such a theory would subject prisoners to a "Catch 22" by establishing a rule that, by virtue of an inmate having fulfilled the requirements necessary to pursue a cause of action in federal court, he would be precluded from prosecuting the very claim he was forced to exhaust.
Nazis establish the first concentration camps for political prisoners.