portrait

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sit for a/(one's) portrait

To pose while having one's portrait painted or photographed. It's tradition that every new president of the company has to sit for a portrait, which is hung in the main foyer of the building. With so many kids, it's always something of a nightmare trying to get everyone to sit for a family portrait each year.
See also: portrait, sit

sit for one's portrait

to serve as the subject of a portrait being done by a painter or photographer. I sat for the picture for two hours. Do you mind sitting for the painter all day? It will be easier if you get it over with all at once.
See also: portrait, sit
References in classic literature ?
The book likewise contained portraits of James Otis and Josiah Quincy.
Clutton looked at the portrait for some time in silence, then glanced at Philip's picture, which was standing on an easel.
On the second morning after the departure of Nicholas for Yorkshire, Kate Nickleby sat in a very faded chair raised upon a very dusty throne in Miss La Creevy's room, giving that lady a sitting for the portrait upon which she was engaged; and towards the full perfection of which, Miss La Creevy had had the street-door case brought upstairs, in order that she might be the better able to infuse into the counterfeit countenance of Miss Nickleby, a bright salmon flesh- tint which she had originally hit upon while executing the miniature of a young officer therein contained, and which bright salmon flesh- tint was considered, by Miss La Creevy's chief friends and patrons, to be quite a novelty in art: as indeed it was.
Mr Twemlow takes his station on a settee before her, and Mrs Lammle shows him a portrait.
"After yours I don't want another portrait. Better have one of Annie" (so she called her baby girl).
"How stupid of me to speak of the portrait," thought the prince as he entered the study, with a feeling of guilt at his heart, "and yet, perhaps I was right after all." He had an idea, unformed as yet, but a strange idea.
Still the portrait seemed to reproach me in a merciless language of its own: "Look at what you were once; think of what you are now!"
As he thought of Hetty Merton, he began to wonder if the portrait in the locked room had changed.
Yes, you are at once from Provence and Spain; that explains, if the portrait you showed me be like, the dark hue I so much admired on the visage of the noble Catalan." It would have required the penetration of Oedipus or the Sphinx to have divined the irony the count concealed beneath these words, apparently uttered with the greatest politeness.
The prince understood how severe towards himself this opinion of the Comte de Guiche was, and he looked somewhat displeased, saying, "My friends are not over indulgent." De Guiche looked at the portrait again, and, after lengthened contemplation, returned it with apparent unwillingness, saying, "Most decidedly, my lord, I should rather prefer to look ten times at your highness, than to look at Madame once again." It seemed as if the chevalier had detected some mystery in these words, which were incomprehensible to the prince, for he exclaimed: "Very well, get married yourself." Monsieur continued painting himself, and when he had finished, looked at the portrait again once more, turned to admire himself in the glass, and smiled, and no doubt was satisfied with the comparison.
You would only have made a better or worse portrait with a background which every connoisseur would give a different reason for or against.
'If that portrait could speak, sir - but it has the advantage over the original of not possessing the power of committing itself and disgusting others, - it would testify, that a long period has elapsed since I first habitually addressed it as the picture of a Noodle.
I stopped as usual before the portrait, which seemed in the lamplight to have a new expression, not easily named, but distinctly uncanny.
In face and figure, he reminded me a little of the portrait of my father at Combe-Raven -- I mean the portrait in the dining-room, of my father when he was a young man.
"You know N- N- received a snuffbox with the portrait last year?" said "the man of profound intellect." "Why shouldn't S- S- get the same distinction?"