point of departure

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point of departure

1. Literally, the point from which one begins one's journey. All customers are being advised that the point of departure for the 3:30 tour bus has been changed.
2. By extension, the point from which further discussion, activity, progress, development, etc., takes place. We are hopeful that this summit will act as a point of departure for future policies dealing with the threat of climate change.
See also: departure, of, point

a ˌpoint of deˈparture


1 a place where a journey starts
2 (formal) an idea, a theory or an event that is used to start a discussion, an activity, etc: Professor Brown’s recent article will certainly be the point of departure for future research on the subject.
See also: departure, of, point
References in periodicals archive ?
Chapter 9, "Points of Departure," turns to Colette's Ble en herbe (1923), Ramon Perez de Ayala's Luna de miel, luna de hiel (1923), Yukio Mishima's Sound of Waves (1954), Genevieve Dormann's Le bal du dodo (1989), Trumans Capote's Grass Harp (1951), the French film Jeux interdits (1951), and Jo-Ann Mapson's Hank and Chloe (1993).
The conceptual points of departure in the house are further explored in the studio.
While specific values depend upon culture and upon the character of the particular institutional setting studied, these two cases serve as instructive points of departure for examining the value conflicts that generally accompany different modes of computerization in other developed and developing countries.
The animals and plants against a neutral background recall possible landscapes, as they offer suddenly, in their burlesque forms, myriad points of departure for gestural painting.
Points of departure for all the project's subsequent activities, these metaphors allowed us to find and attribute to the city many different forms and develop a way to tell the story of a place that confounds distinctions between fact and fiction, reality and representation.
The largest and most ambitious panel painting, Untitled (Man with Gun, Man on Ground, Men with Blindfold), 2000, takes as its points of departure Goya's Third of May, 1808, 1814, and Manet's The Execution of Emperor Maximilian, 1867, to portray the execution of three animal-headed men.
In so doing the artist draws attention to certain points of departure toward a contemporary approach to representation.
He has used scripts, sound tracks, and subtitles as points of departure for his various projects, as well as dealing with dubbing, translation, and remaking.