artistic/poetic licence

(redirected from Poetic licence)
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artistic license

1. Intentional violations of or deviations from traditional forms, standards, or syntax by a writer in order to achieve a particular effect. Don't get hung up on adhering too strictly to iambic pentameter—you can use a bit of artistic license if it means preserving the meaning and rhythm you want. Any two-bit poet can string together a jumble of words and call it artistic license.
2. Minor changes to or misrepresentations of facts or history in the name of art or for the sake of an agenda. People complain about minor inaccuracies in historical dramas, but honestly they wouldn't be able to make the movies marketable without using a little artistic license.
See also: artistic, license

poetic license

1. Intentional violations of or deviations from traditional forms, standards, or syntax by a writer in order to achieve a particular effect. Don't get hung up on adhering too strictly to iambic pentameter—you can use a bit of poetic license if it means preserving the meaning and rhythm you want. Any two-bit poet can string together a jumble of words and call it poetic license.
2. Minor changes to or misrepresentations of facts or history in the name of art or for the sake of an agenda. People complain about minor inaccuracies in historical dramas, but honestly they wouldn't be able to make the movies marketable without using a little poetic license.
See also: license, poetic

artistic/poetic ˈlicence

(often ironic) the freedom of artists or writers to change facts in order to make a story, painting, etc. more interesting or beautiful: In the book, a fair amount of artistic licence has been taken with the timing of historical events so that they fit with the story.I allowed myself a little poetic licence in describing the table as an antique.
Licence in this idiom means ‘freedom to do or say whatever you want’.
See also: artistic, licence, poetic
References in periodicals archive ?
Again, no snow, although Dylan remembered going out, "gloved and mufflered, padding through the streets, leaving huge deep footprints in the snow." It's called poetic licence and, after all, as we shall be relentlessly reminded on his 100th birthday next year, he was a poet.
He said: "My missus gets upset and sometimes takes a bit of poetic licence to fire a broadside back.
But a nature note informs readers that the author and illustrator have taken poetic licence, as beavers do not usually lose their teeth, a conundrum which makes the tale misleading and confusing for some.
This tactic, with a dash of poetic licence, has a history, of course--think Maggie Thatcher, purloiner of children's dairy products--and the Eye would be pleased to see a revival of the practice.
Over the following 150 years, this remained the only English version, although scholars occasionally complained that Whatton took too much poetic licence. Sometimes his translation is misleading, because of his lack of astronomical background.
"Everyone knows that Boris Johnson likes to employ a little poetic licence, but he has gone too far this time.
What do you mean, poetic licence?" Ah well, some things never change.
It''s not real life and surely, as a writer, Ms Costello has heard of poetic licence? Paul Nuttall, UK Independence Party North West MEP
However Maxse was in fact using "poetic licence" and could not have seen that take place.
And I suppose we must allow the writer/director some poetic licence.
My mom used to say she saw the pilot grinning as he shot up the area, but I think that was probably poetic licence. What wasn't poetic licence was the bomb peck on Nechells Green opposite the Beehive pub, where some houses and the occupants had been blown up It was a place where I would spend hours playing in the dirt and bits of rubble.
Calthorpe Estates' affirmation that the building is located in the commercial district is at best poetic licence.
I am sure that there are people out there that know a great deal about the time span that has been covered that would read this book and be disappointed because the author is telling his own version of events with his 'poetic licence' in overdrive.
The author is energetically imaginative; and takes poetic licence along the way.
It's not very likely either that the blokes manning this telescope in Parkes, New South Wales, were anything like as funny as this bunch - so thank God for poetic licence. This small proud step in Australia's history is so full of small town Aussie sunshine that you can almost smell the Vegemite.