pine

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ride the pine

In sports (especially baseball), to remain sitting on the bench, rather than be an active participant in the game. Primarily heard in US. I'm not going to play next year if coach makes me ride the pine again this season. I rode the pine for the rest of the game after I pulled my hamstring sliding to first base.
See also: pine, ride

pine away

To lapse into a period of intense depression or melancholy due to one's longing for or grief over someone or something. I stayed back in Seattle pining away, while she was over in Europe having the time of her life. My grandfather pined away for nearly a year after my grandmother died, until eventually his heart gave out and he passed away as well.
See also: away, pine

pine after (someone or something)

To desire or grieve over someone or something so intensely that one becomes depressed or melancholy. You can't just sitting here pining after your ex-boyfriend. It's after—you need to get out there and live your life! I can't stand these kids who pine after the latest, most expensive tech gadgets, even when they literally have no need for them!
See also: after, pine

pine over (someone or something)

To desire or grieve over someone or something so intensely that one becomes depressed or melancholy. You can't just sitting here pining over your ex-boyfriend. It's over—you need to get out there and live your life! I can't stand these kids who pine over the latest, most expensive tech gadgets, even when they literally have no need for them!
See also: over, pine

pine for (someone or something)

To desire or grieve over someone or something so intensely that one becomes depressed or melancholy. You can't just sitting here pining for your ex-boyfriend. It's over—you need to get out there and live your life! I can't stand these kids who pine for the latest, most expensive tech gadgets, even when they literally have no need for them!
See also: pine

pine after someone or something

 and pine for someone or something; pine over someone or something
to long for or grieve for someone or something. Bob pined after Doris for weeks after she left. Dan is still pining for his lost dog. There is no point in pining over Claire.
See also: after, pine

pine away (after someone or something)

to waste away in melancholy and longing for someone or something. A year later, he was still pining away after Claire. Still, he is pining away.
See also: away, pine

ride the pine (or bench)

(of an athlete) not participate in a game or event, typically because of poor form. North American informal
See also: pine, ride

pine away

v.
To wither or waste away from longing or grief: After its owner was killed, the old dog pined away and died.
See also: away, pine

pine for

v.
To long or grieve intensely for someone or something: All summer he sat in the garden pining for his girlfriend back home. Many teachers pine for the days when students were better behaved.
See also: pine
References in periodicals archive ?
This trait, along with the nutcracker's willingness to fly far with the seeds, helps the pines regenerate deep into the charred heart of seemingly inaccessible burn sites.
Habitat manipulation began in 1976, when mature pines were harvested for wood chips and paper and then seedlings planted to duplicate, within a matter of just a few years, the scruffy 80acre forest patches sprinkled with numerous sunny openings thick with grass and brushy cover that the warblers desire.
Fire is an even less-frequent visitor to the highest elevations, where whitebark pine and subalpine larch rule.
The federally endangered red-cockaded woodpecker, whose colonies have dwindled from an estimated 500,000 to some 5,000 nationwide, are almost wholly dependent for nesting habitat on longleaf pines more than a century old (the woodpecker excavates cavities in rotting heartwood).
These "yellow belly" or yellow pines, as they're known, were three to four feet in diameter - maybe 150 feet high, rustically "plated" with seemingly endless sequences of jigsaw-like layers of rust-colored bark.