persuasion

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of a/an/the (something) persuasion

Having the characteristics of a certain type or thing mentioned. Her parents are of a more conservative persuasion, so they don't really approve of our relationship. When it came to light that she had several friends of the communist persuasion, she was blacklisted from the industry immediately.
See also: of, persuasion

of the persuasion that

Having the firm belief that something is the case. I actually know someone who's of the persuasion that the Earth is flat. They're pretty normal other than that bizarre conviction.
See also: of, persuasion, that

of the persuasion (that)

holding a belief that something is true or is in existence. Anne is of the persuasion that supports that candidate for mayor. The paranoid person was of the persuasion that aliens lived among us.
See also: of, persuasion

of a/the... persuasion

(formal or humorous) of the type mentioned: As a young man, Max had always been of an artistic persuasion.peers of the Liberal persuasion
See also: of, persuasion
References in periodicals archive ?
The fourth source of efficacy according to Bandura (1986, 1997) is verbal persuasion. Verbal persuasion is a source of information about the process of teaching as well as a source of encouragement and feedback about a teacher's performance.
They also stated that verbal persuasion in form of topics covered in the educational psychology course guided their classroom observation tasks, making them aware of different issues that may arise in the teaching process and improved their perceptions of personal teaching skills.
Preservice teachers enrolled this course being exposed to verbal persuasion and vicarious experiences had unique and richer experiences than those preservice teachers who were not enrolled this course.
In fact, although variants of the word "hope" occur 80 times in Persuasion (28 nouns, 52 verbs), much of the novel tracks Anne's state of hopelessness, a word that occurs only once (though "hopeless" is used 6 times).
"More Distinguished in His Domestic Virtues: Captain Wentworth Comes Home." Persuasions 26 (2004): 146-55.
"A Devoted Reticence: The Art of Telling and Not Telling in Jane Austen's Persuasion" Persuasions 26 (2004): 159-69.
Against its lively, comic, optimistic tale of a young woman's moral growth, Emma counterpoints a somber vision of the vulnerability of our lives that anticipates Persuasion. Even as it explores those "blessings of existence" (3) that counteract its devastations, Emma expresses an incipient awareness, developed more fully in Persuasion, of our very limited power to contend with the blows of fortune.
Unlike Louisa Musgrove's accident, which plays a prominent role in Persuasion, Jane's predates the action of the novel, and the information about it is buried in Miss Bates's chatter.
The essays offered here in Persuasions continue tire dialogue about reading and meaning in our busy, complicated, angst-filled existences.
Over the last quarter of a century, Persuasions itself has grown incrementally from a booklet of approximately thirty pages to a peer-reviewed compendium of all things Austen.
Austen's use of dance and the dance metaphor can most effectively be understood if Persuasion is first situated within the landscape of Regency Era social dance.
The role of the square formation in country-dance has been emphasized here because Persuasion is modeled on this dance form.