People (who live) in glass houses shouldn't throw stones.

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People (who live) in glass houses shouldn't throw stones.

People who are vulnerable to criticism should not criticize others, especially not for the faults that they themselves have (since such criticism will likely be returned). He's been hounding his opponent for dodging taxes, when it's public knowledge that he still owes the IRS for years of tax delinquency. People in glass houses shouldn't throw stones! A: "She just spends her time complaining about other people. It's so shallow and annoying!" B: "Now, now—people who live in glass houses shouldn't throw stones."
See also: glass, house, people, throw

People who live in glass houses shouldn't throw stones.

Prov. You should not criticize other people for having the same faults that you yourself have. Jill: Richard sure was drinking a lot at the office party. Jane: I noticed you had quite a few cocktails yourself. People who live in glass houses shouldn't throw stones.
See also: glass, house, live, people, stone, throw, who

people who live in glass houses shouldn't throw stones

One who is open to criticism should not criticize others, as in It's stupid of Mike to mention his opponent's accepting donations from lobbyists-people who live in glass houses! This proverb is so well known that it is often shortened. [Late 1300s] Also see pot calling the kettle black.
See also: glass, house, live, people, stone, throw, who

people who live in glass houses shouldn't throw stones

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people in glass houses shouldn't throw stones

If you say people who live in glass houses shouldn't throw stones, you mean that people should not criticize others for faults that they themselves have. When will they learn? People in glass houses really shouldn't throw stones.
See also: glass, house, live, people, stone, throw, who

people (who live) in glass ˌhouses shouldn’t throw ˈstones

(saying) you should not criticize other people for faults that you have yourself: ‘He said you weren’t entirely honest in business.’ ‘Oh, did he? Well tell him from me that people who live in glass houses shouldn’t throw stones. He’ll know what I mean.’
See also: glass, house, people, stone, throw

people who live in glass houses shouldn't throw stones

Those who themselves are open to criticism or vulnerable to attack should not attack others. This proverb dates from the time of Chaucer, who used a version of it in Troilus and Criseyde (ca. 1374). George Herbert wrote: “Whose house is of glass, From cast of stones must not throw stones at another” (Jacula Prudentum, 1640). See also pot calling the kettle black.
See also: glass, house, live, people, stone, throw, who
References in periodicals archive ?
Glickman, who was hired to design the building's mechanical systems, said the building brings challenges: "While they say that people who live in glass houses should not throw stones, people who construct glass buildings need to be even more careful.
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