passion

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passion pit

dated slang A place, especially a drive-in movie theater, where many young people come together on dates or romantic outings, so called because of the tendency for physical intimacy to occur there. A: "Let's go out this weekend." B: "OK, let's see what's playing at the passion pit." There's this passion pit a little ways up in the mountains where high schoolers and college kids park their cars and hook up.
See also: passion, pit

have a passion for (something)

To have a very strong interest in something. Rich has a real passion for photography—you should see some of the cool, artsy shots he took at the concert. Paulina's always had a passion for languages, so I'm not surprised that she's learning Italian now.
See also: have, passion

have a passion for someone or something

Fig. to have a strong feeling of need or desire for someone, something, or some activity. Mary has a great passion for chocolate. John has a passion for fishing, so he fishes as often as he can.
See also: have, passion

passion-pit

n. a drive-in movie theater; any place where young people go to neck, such as an area where teenagers park. (Dated but still heard.) She wanted me to drive down to the passion-pit, but I said I had a headache.
References in periodicals archive ?
figure By NYT Passion can be an energising, fulfilling force, the stuff upon which businesses are built, works of art are created and Olympic medals are won.However, if you're not careful, passion can become an equally destructive curse, leading to suffering and distress.
The Passion Made Possible campaign encouraged travelers to discover their own passions as it shared the inspiring, real-life stories of driven and extraordinary Singaporeans.
In particular, a participant's passion for a specific activity can be used as an important measuring parameter in predicting adherence to that activity (Vallerand, 2008).
(7) Fear, confidence, and anger are all passions; the use of money, an action.
(2003) first proposed the concept of passion for activities, suggesting that passion entails "a strong inclination toward an activity that people like, that they find important, and in which they invest time and energy" (p.
The Passions Project evolved through Wagner's work in a community of elders in Boulder, Colorado wherein the photographer came to realize that many of the people she was getting to know led active lives in which their various passions and interests play a central role — activities that bring joy, but perhaps go unnoticed by those in the community at large.
Ultimately, there will be a searchable national database of passions and subjects.
John Passion -- A Sacred Oratorio'' is a work of legendary beauty and power.
Cummings, Brian and Freya Sierhuis, eds, Passions and Subjectivity in Early Modern Culture, Farnham, Ashgate, 2013; hardback; pp.
I don't know where this all came from but it's especially noticeable in the younger generation, who seem to have been brain–washed into pronouncing their passions to anyone who'll listen.
Nevertheless, there is a common ground here in these modem political thinkers, who believed that justice and political order require that we steer away from our passions and desires, and rely upon detached reason for political consensus.
Maiers, an educator and consultant in literacy and literacy education, and Sandvold, an administrator and teacher, explain how to encourage passionate learning in the classroom using a framework they call "The Clubhouse Classroom." They detail how to create it, the role of passion in learning, how students can practice passions through learning clubs, and the elements, behaviors, and expectations needed to transform passion into scholarly engagement.
The Passions of Modernism: Eliot, Yeats, Woolf, and Mann.
The star is creative director of a revival of the play, renamed Passions, and penned by Owen Sheers, which will be staged on four nights in the open air in Port Talbot over Easter next year.
(2008) model, if both harmonious and obsessive passions contribute positively to such a transition, it is exclusively as a result of deliberate practice influenced by the adoption of mastery goals.