Dame Partington and her mop

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Dame Partington and her mop

Someone staunchly opposed to progress or reform, even when it is inevitable. The phrase is thought to have originated from stories in 19th-century England of a woman who kept trying to get water out of her flooded home during a storm before finally evacuating. I can't believe you're still fighting against that new tax! Stop being like Dame Partington and her mop and just accept change!
See also: and, mop
References in classic literature ?
Thus came the Queen's Page, young Richard Partington, from famous London Town down into Nottinghamshire, upon Her Majesty's bidding, to seek Robin Hood in Sherwood Forest.
The road was hot and dusty and his journey had been long, for that day he had come all the way from Leicester Town, a good twenty miles and more; wherefore young Partington was right glad when he saw before him a sweet little inn, all shady and cool beneath the trees, in front of the door of which a sign hung pendant, bearing the picture of a blue boar.
Young Partington poured forth the bright yellow wine and holding the glass aloft, cried, "Here is to the health and long happiness of my royal mistress, the noble Queen Eleanor; and may my journey and her desirings soon have end, and I find a certain stout yeoman men call Robin Hood.
Then one of the two, whom Partington thought to be the tallest and stoutest fellow he had ever beheld, spoke up and said, "What seekest thou of Robin Hood, Sir Page?
An thou knowest aught of him, good fellow," said young Partington, "thou wilt do great service to him and great pleasure to our royal Queen by aiding me to find him.
Set thy mind at ease; I bring nought of ill with me," quoth Richard Partington.
Then Partington paid his score, and the yeomen coming forward, they all straightway departed upon their way.
All listened in silence, for young Allan's singing was one of the greatest joys in all the world to them; but as they so listened there came of a sudden the sound of a horse's feet, and presently Little John and Will Stutely came forth from the forest path into the open glade, young Richard Partington riding between them upon his milk-white horse.
Then young Partington said, "If I err not, thou art the famous Robin Hood, and these thy stout band of outlawed yeomen.
Then, seeing all were ready, young Partington mounted his horse again, and the yeomen having shaken hands all around, the five departed upon their way.
I am Richard Partington, page to Her Majesty, Queen Eleanor," answered the lad with dignity; and again the sound of his voice troubled Robin sorely.
And I am but a sorry page," replied Marian; "for I had clean forgot that I was Richard Partington, and really did bring you a message from Queen Eleanor
Of the fish patrolmen under whom we served at various times, Charley Le Grant and I were agreed, I think, that Neil Partington was the best.
Not only did Neil Partington interpose no obstacle to our adventure, but he proved to be of the greatest assistance.
We offered to share with Partington whatever we should get from Mr.