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a walk in the park

A task or activity that is easy or effortless to accomplish. I've been running marathons for years now, so this 5K run will be a walk in the park for me. It's clear that the role is a walk in the park for the veteran actor.
See also: park, walk

hit (something) out of the (ball)park

To do or perform something extraordinarily well; to produce or earn an exceptional achievement. An allusion to a baseball that is hit hard enough to land outside the stadium. Great job on that report, Jacobs—you really hit it out of the park! I'm pretty sure I hit that test out of the ballpark.
See also: hit, of, out

in park

Of a vehicle, having the gear stick set to "park," which keeps the vehicle in place in a manner similar to a parking brake. A: "How did the car roll forward like that?" B: "Are you sure you had it in park?" Oh yeah, you're close enough to the curb. Go ahead, put the car in park.
See also: park

in the same ballpark

1. Close to a specific cost or amount. I will only sell the house if the buyer's offer is in the same ballpark as the price I want to get. No, the salary isn't as high as I had hoped, but I accepted it because it's in the same ballpark at least.
2. Similar in overall nature or characteristics. I think the two countries are in the same ballpark when it comes to environmental policies.
See also: ballpark, same

knock (something) out of the (ball)park

To do or perform something extraordinarily well; to produce or earn an exceptional achievement. An allusion to a baseball that is hit hard enough to land outside the stadium. Great job on that report, Jacobs—you really knocked it out of the park! I had expected to knock that test out of the ballpark, but I barely scraped by with a D.
See also: knock, of, out

park (one) in

To park an automobile in front of one's own vehicle, thus preventing one from leaving one's parking space. If you hadn't parked me in, I wouldn't have had to push your car out of the way with mine, so the damage is really your own fault! The delivery truck was stopped on the small side road completing an order when some idiot parked him in.
See also: park

park it

1. To sit down and stop moving. Often used as an imperative. We've been hiking for a while now. Why don't we park it and have a bit to eat, shall we? I want you to park it in this chair and sit still until I'm done!
2. To stop arguing about the matter at hand; to leave some issue alone. Often used as an imperative. OK, guys, that's enough arguing. Let's just park it for a while, all right? Tommy, Sarah, park it! I've had enough of your bickering.
See also: park

park that thought

imperative Do not forget what you were saying, because I need to change the subject. Sorry, Mark, park that thought for a minute. I need to take this phone call.
See also: park, that, thought

park the bus

In football (soccer), to employ all (or nearly all) of a team's active players in defending its own side of the pitch. Protecting a narrow one-point lead, it looks like the home team has parked the bus for the remaining minutes of the match.
See also: bus, park

park the pink Plymouth (in the garage of love)

vulgar slang Of a male, to have sexual intercourse (with someone, especially a woman). In this usage, "pink Plymouth" is a vulgar slang term for the penis. A Plymouth was a brand of car. I got the feeling during the date that the only thing he was interested in was parking the pink Plymouth. Nearly every boy in high school is preoccupied with trying to park the pink Plymouth in the garage of love.
See also: of, park, pink, Plymouth

trailer (park) trash

derogatory slur A poor, uneducated, and unsophisticated person who lives in or was raised in a trailer park. Just because I come from a caravan park doesn't make me trailer trash. I'm working on my PhD at Harvard, for goodness' sake! I don't want my daughter going out with trailer park trash like him!
See also: trailer, trash
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

in park

[of an automobile transmission] having the gears locked so the automobile cannot move. The driver stopped the car and placed it in park. You have to be in park in order to start this car.
See also: park

park it (somewhere)

Inf. sit down somewhere; sit down and get out of the way. Hey, park it! You're in the way. Richard, park it over there in the corner. Stop pacing around. You make me nervous.
See also: park
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

in the same ballpark

If one person or thing is in the same ballpark as another, the first person or thing is similar to the second, or is as good as the second. Note: A ballpark is a park or stadium where baseball is played. As a general investigative agency, they're not in the same ballpark as the FBI. Their outlets aren't in the same ballpark as the larger superstores.
See also: ballpark, same

a walk in the park

If something is a walk in the park, it is very easy or pleasant. That project was a walk in the park compared to this one. Compare with a piece of cake.
See also: park, walk
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

a walk in the park

something very easy or trouble-free. informal
2001 Film Inside Out She acts her socks off and yet the zany quality, that was a walk in the park for Hepburn, seems like a struggle for her.
See also: park, walk
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

a walk in the ˈpark

(especially American English) used to say that something is easy to do: We succeeded, but it was not a walk in the park for any of us.
See also: park, walk
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

park in

v.
To prevent some parked vehicle from being able to leave by blocking it with another vehicle: The van stopped in the right lane of traffic and parked a small car in. I honked my horn until the people who parked me in moved their car. My car was parked in, so I took a cab to my appointment.
See also: park
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

park

in. to neck or to make love, especially in a parked car. They still park, but they don’t have a name for it anymore.

park it (somewhere)

tv. sit down somewhere; sit down and get out of the way. Bart, park it over there in the corner. Stop pacing around. You make me nervous.
See also: park, somewhere

park it

verb
See also: park

park the pink Plymouth

n. to copulate. He set out to park the pink plymouth but ended up in a train wreck.
See also: park, pink, Plymouth

trailer park trash

and TPT
n. trailer park trash. My motor home cost more than your house, and you call me TPT?
See also: park, trailer, trash
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

walk in the park

Something that is easy to do or accomplish.
See also: park, walk
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

walk in the park, a

Easy, without problems or difficulty. This slangy transfer of a pleasant outing to other contexts dates from the twentieth century. James Patterson used it in London Bridges (2004), when a character checks on the safety of his grandmother: “Everything fine there. Walk in the park, right, Nana?” The synonymous walk on the beach is sometimes substituted but is heard somewhat less often.
See also: walk
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in classic literature ?
All that day the Prince was negotiating with Washington, while his detached scouts sought far and wide over the Eastern States looking for anything resembling an aeronautic park. A squadron of twenty airships detached overnight had dropped out of the air upon Niagara and was holding the town and power works.
But John Boulnois changed his mind; John Boulnois left his home abruptly and all alone, and came over to this darned Park an hour or so ago.
That American reporter told me he had been to your house, and your butler told him Mr Boulnois had gone to Pendragon Park after all."
"Right, right!" rejoined the cleric energetically, and set off scuttling up the path towards the Park gates.
I said I had gone across to Pendragon Park and shut the door in his face.
If that was the case, why should she be anxious to have her visit at Blackwater Park kept a secret from him?
I wish my first day at Blackwater Park had not been associated with death, though it is only the death of a stray animal.
It was arranged that Amelia was to spend the morning with the ladies of Park Lane, where all were very kind to her.
The great family coach of the Osbornes transported him to Park Lane from Russell Square; where the young ladies, who were not themselves invited, and professed the greatest indifference at that slight, nevertheless looked at Sir Pitt Crawley's name in the baronetage; and learned everything which that work had to teach about the Crawley family and their pedigree, and the Binkies, their relatives,
However, they made an engagement for the next, somewhere: to look at a horse that Crawley had to sell, and to try him in the Park; and to dine together, and to pass the evening with some jolly fellows.
Some short period after the above events, and Miss Rebecca Sharp still remaining at her patroness's house in Park Lane, one more hatchment might have been seen in Great Gaunt Street, figuring amongst the many which usually ornament that dismal quarter.
He had found time, nevertheless, to call often in Park Lane, and to despatch many notes to Rebecca, entreating her, enjoining her, commanding her to return to her young pupils in the country, who were now utterly without companionship during their mother's illness.
In 1829 he reentered Africa by the western coast of the Gulf of Benin; he then followed in the track of Mungo Park and of Laing, recovered at Boussa the documents relative to the death of the former, and arrived on the 20th of August at Sackatoo, where he was seized and held as a prisoner, until he expired in the arms of his faithful attendant Richard Lander."
Courtesy of Mundelein Parks and Recreation District
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