park

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hit (something) out of the (ball)park

To do or perform something extraordinarily well; to produce or earn an exceptional achievement. An allusion to hitting a home run in baseball that lands outside the stadium. Great job on that report, Jacobs—you really hit it out of the park! I'm pretty sure I hit that test out of the ballpark.
See also: hit, of, out

park that thought

imperative Do not forget what you were saying, because I need to change the subject. Sorry, Mark, park that thought for a minute. I need to take this phone call.
See also: park, that, thought

park the bus

In football (soccer), to employ all (or nearly all) of a team's active players in defending its own side of the pitch. Protecting a narrow one-point lead, it looks like the home team has parked the bus for the remaining minutes of the match.
See also: bus, park

trailer (park) trash

derogatory slur A poor, uneducated, and unsophisticated person who lives in or was raised in a trailer park. Just because I come from a caravan park doesn't make me trailer trash. I'm working on my PhD at Harvard, for goodness' sake! I don't want my daughter going out with trailer park trash like him!
See also: trailer, trash

in the same ballpark

1. Close to a specific cost or amount. I will only sell the house if the buyer's offer is in the same ballpark as the price I want to get. No, the salary isn't as high as I had hoped, but I accepted it because it's in the same ballpark at least.
2. Similar in overall nature or characteristics. I think the two countries are in the same ballpark when it comes to environmental policies.
See also: ballpark, same

in park

[of an automobile transmission] having the gears locked so the automobile cannot move. The driver stopped the car and placed it in park. You have to be in park in order to start this car.
See also: park

park it (somewhere)

Inf. sit down somewhere; sit down and get out of the way. Hey, park it! You're in the way. Richard, park it over there in the corner. Stop pacing around. You make me nervous.
See also: park

in the same ballpark

If one person or thing is in the same ballpark as another, the first person or thing is similar to the second, or is as good as the second. Note: A ballpark is a park or stadium where baseball is played. As a general investigative agency, they're not in the same ballpark as the FBI. Their outlets aren't in the same ballpark as the larger superstores.
See also: ballpark, same

a walk in the park

If something is a walk in the park, it is very easy or pleasant. That project was a walk in the park compared to this one. Compare with a piece of cake.
See also: park, walk

a walk in the park

something very easy or trouble-free. informal
2001 Film Inside Out She acts her socks off and yet the zany quality, that was a walk in the park for Hepburn, seems like a struggle for her.
See also: park, walk

a walk in the ˈpark

(especially American English) used to say that something is easy to do: We succeeded, but it was not a walk in the park for any of us.
See also: park, walk

park in

v.
To prevent some parked vehicle from being able to leave by blocking it with another vehicle: The van stopped in the right lane of traffic and parked a small car in. I honked my horn until the people who parked me in moved their car. My car was parked in, so I took a cab to my appointment.
See also: park

park

in. to neck or to make love, especially in a parked car. They still park, but they don’t have a name for it anymore.

park it (somewhere)

tv. sit down somewhere; sit down and get out of the way. Bart, park it over there in the corner. Stop pacing around. You make me nervous.
See also: park, somewhere

park it

verb
See also: park

park the pink Plymouth

n. to copulate. He set out to park the pink plymouth but ended up in a train wreck.
See also: park, pink

trailer park trash

and TPT
n. trailer park trash. My motor home cost more than your house, and you call me TPT?
See also: park, trailer, trash

walk in the park

Something that is easy to do or accomplish.
See also: park, walk
References in classic literature ?
She seemed to wish to show him something, not far off, in the park.
She left the Park again, and found herself in the streets without knowing where.
I turned back away from the park and struck into Park Road, intending to skirt the park, went along under the shelter of the terraces, and got a view of this stationary, howling Martian from the direction of St.
Far away, through a gap in the trees, I saw a second Martian, as motionless as the first, standing in the park towards the Zoological Gardens, and silent.
Rushworth's account, who was partly expected at the Park that day; but it was felt as a very grievous injury, and her good manners were severely taxed to conceal her vexation and anger till she reached home.
cried Edmund; "has she been walking as well as cutting roses; walking across the hot park to your house, and doing it twice, ma'am?
He had already realized, from the documents, that Prior's Park had originally been something like Prior's Farm, named after some local figure, but the new social conditions were all against his tracing the story by its traditions.
I can't tell you all about it now, for there's Matilda, I see, in the park, and I must go and open my budget to her.
It's the first place after you leave the park, and must have grown while Spofford Avenue was still a country road.
He himself left the Park at the same time, strolled along Piccadilly as far as Sackville Street and let himself into his rooms.
The time that I met him alone was on a bright, but not oppressively hot day, in the beginning of July: I had taken little Arthur into the wood that skirts the park, and there seated him on the moss- cushioned roots of an old oak; and, having gathered a handful of bluebells and wild-roses, I was kneeling before him, and presenting them, one by one, to the grasp of his tiny fingers; enjoying the heavenly beauty of the flowers, through the medium of his smiling eyes: forgetting, for the moment, all my cares, laughing at his gleeful laughter, and delighting myself with his delight, - when a shadow suddenly eclipsed the little space of sunshine on the grass before us; and looking up, I beheld Walter Hargrave standing and gazing upon us.
He raised the hatch of his storm-tossed vessel and made the inquiry that cabbies do make in the park.
The cab was already at the park gate and Robert Darzac was begging Frederic Larsan to open it for him, explaining that he was pressed for time to catch the next train leaving Epinay for Paris.
Crawley sent over a choice parcel of tracts, to prepare her for the change from Vanity Fair and Park Lane for another world; but a good doctor from Southampton being called in in time, vanquished the lobster which was so nearly fatal to her, and gave her sufficient strength to enable her to return to London.
They come back, accompanied by Count Fosco and his wife, who propose to settle somewhere in the neighbourhood of London, and who have engaged to stay at Blackwater Park for the summer months before deciding on a place of residence.
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