palace

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Related to Palaces: Royal palaces

gin mill

slang A bar, especially one that is run-down. Are you guys hungover? You spent an awful lot of time at that gin mill last night!
See also: gin, mill

gin palace

slang A bar. Are you guys hungover? You spent an awful lot of time at that gin palace last night!
See also: gin, palace

ice palace

slang A jewelry store. ("Ice" is a slang term for diamonds.) He must have gone to a pretty fancy ice palace to find such a gorgeous engagement ring.
See also: ice, palace

palace politics

The relationships, interactions, designs, and inner workings of the top members of a political organization (not necessarily of a monarchy or empire). Used especially in relation to internal rivalry, plotting, double crossing, etc. The country has faced its fair share of problems since shaking off the dictatorship, not the least of which being the intense palace politics of the newly formed government.
See also: palace, politics

ptomaine palace

Any place that serves particularly disgusting, putrid, or inedible food. ("Ptomaine" refers to amines or alkaloids produced by putrefying organic matter, typically animal tissue. Used in reference especially the dining facility of institutions such as schools or military barracks.) I would avoid that restaurant at all costs—it's a real ptomaine palace
See also: palace, ptomaine

gin mill

and gin dive and gin palace
n. a saloon; a low liquor establishment. (Older.) Fred hit every gin mill on the way home. The joint looks like a gin dive. I’m not going in there!
See also: gin, mill

gin palace

verb
See also: gin, palace

ice palace

n. a jewelry store. (From ice.) What do they sell in that ice palace that you could afford to buy?
See also: ice, palace

ptomaine-domain

and ptomaine-palace (ˈtoˈmen...)
n. any institutional dining facility; a mess hall; a cafeteria. Welcome to the ptomaine-domain. Help yourself to some mystery meat. Time to go over to the ptomaine-palace and eat—if you can call it that.

ptomaine-palace

verb
References in classic literature ?
"Most likely she had then withdrawn into some small apartment of her palace," said Don Quixote, "to amuse herself with damsels, as great ladies and princesses are accustomed to do."
The beautiful palace nestles among the grand old groves of the park, the park sits in the lap of the picturesque crags and hills, and both look out upon the breezy ocean.
It was late in the morning of the next day that a giant serving man in the harness of the house of a great Ptarth noble passed out into the city from the palace gates.
But the King and Queen were sitting under an umbrella before the palace door.
If we attempt to escape through the doors of the palace we shall surely be captured.
"I will," promised the Tin Woodman; and then he followed the Nome King to the entrance to the palace and the rock closed behind him.
It was on the third day when a little personage without horse or equipage, came marching right boldly up to the palace; his eyes shone like yours, he had beautiful long hair, but his clothes were very shabby."
My first thought when the battle was over was for Kantos Kan, and leaving Dejah Thoris in charge of Tars Tarkas I took a dozen warriors and hastened to the dungeons beneath the palace. The jailers had all left to join the fighters in the throne room, so we searched the labyrinthine prison without opposition.
But Aladdin refused, saying, "I must build a palace fit for her," and took his leave.
Don't remind me that I have just rejected the palace of crystal for the sole reason that one cannot put out one's tongue at it.
At a considerable distance from the shore stood a marble palace, which appeared to be very spacious, and had a great deal of smoke curling out of one of its chimneys."
They did not think long, but replied, 'Let him build your Majesty in one day a more beautiful palace than this, and if he fails in the attempt let him be hung.'
A large hedge of thorns soon grew round the palace, and every year it became higher and thicker; till at last the old palace was surrounded and hidden, so that not even the roof or the chimneys could be seen.
This magnificent palace had been got ready for the reception of the greatest reigning sovereign of the time.
He saw that when the Lady Maud accompanied him they were wont to repair to the farthermost extremities of the palace grounds where, by a little postern gate, she admitted a certain officer of the Guards to whom the Queen had forbidden the privilege of the court.