paddy wagon

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paddy wagon

slang A police vehicle, especially a large van, used to transport criminals or suspects to prison. (Potentially offensive, as "paddy" is a derogatory slang term for an Irish person, though the connection between the two terms is debated.) Nearly two dozen looters were thrown into paddy wagons by police forces trying to quell the riots. After Jeff got drunk and started assaulting a bouncer, he ended his night in the back of a paddy wagon.
See also: paddy, wagon
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

paddy wagon

n. a police van used to take suspected criminals to the police station. The cop put the woman in handcuffs and then called the paddy wagon.
See also: paddy, wagon
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Paddywagon vehicles have had windows smashed, tyres slashed and slogans painted on them.
So far this year, Paddywagon has had six "very costly" attacks on their coaches - and last summer a number of buses were burned out by thugs.
"However, senseless vandalism makes Paddywagon and others reconsider.
CHALLENGE: Paddywagon Tours boss will leave workers to it
Up to five seats have been taken from dozens of prisoner conveyance vehicles - commonly known as paddywagons.
The rear entrance of the new district headquarters, which cost EUR3.7million to build, is said by councillors to be half a metre too narrow for Paddywagons, trailers and even ambulances.
Joe Farrell, a driver with the Dublin- based Paddywagons company, said: "Those vehicles were carrying 39 tourists, all foreigners who wanted to see around Belfast.
"Mine is a big green van with Paddywagons written on the side so it is fairly obvious where it is from.
Joe Farrell, a driver with the Dublin- based Paddywagons company, said: ''Those vehicles were carrying 39 tourists, all foreigners who wanted to see around Belfast.