packet

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cop a packet

To be seriously injured. This phrase originated in the military. I got sent home after copping a packet during my tour of duty.
See also: cop, packet

earn a packet

To earn a very large amount of money, especially by doing something very successfully. We'll earn a packet if we can manage to secure a trading partner in China. I hear Sarah is earning a packet with sales from her latest novel.
See also: earn, packet

lose a packet

To lose a very large amount of money, especially all at the same time. The sudden plunge in the company's stock price meant investors around the world have lost a packet. I vowed never to go into a casino again after losing a packet at the slot machines last Saturday.
See also: lose, packet

make a packet

To make a very large amount of money, especially by doing something very successfully. We'll make a packet if we can manage to secure a trading partner in China. I hear Sarah is making a packet with sales from her latest novel.
See also: make, packet

pay packet

1. Literally, an envelope or small parcel containing an employee's earnings. Primarily heard in UK. Back when I started working here, before online banking and direct debit, everyone got their pay packet put in their hand at the end of each week.
2. By extension, a person's salary or rate of pay from an employer. Primarily heard in UK. The public outcry has been immense over revelations of the charity CEO's outrageous annual pay packet.
See also: packet, pay

spend a packet

To spend a very large amount of money, especially all at the same time. We spent a packet securing our partnership with the Chinese manufacturers. I hear Sarah is spending a packet to self-publish her novel.
See also: packet, spend
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

cop a packet

to become badly injured; to be wounded severely. (Originally military.) My uncle copped a packet in Normandy. If you want to cop a packet or worse, just stand up in that shallow trench, son.
See also: cop, packet
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cop a packet

1 be killed, especially in battle. 2 contract a venereal disease. informal euphemistic
See also: cop, packet
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

make, lose, spend, etc. a ˈpacket

(informal) make, etc. a large amount of money: He went to the USA and made a packet in office property.We spent a packet on our weekend away — everything was so expensive.
See also: packet
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017
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References in classic literature ?
The old contracts (they will be revised at the end of the year) allow twelve hours for a run which any packet can put behind her in ten.
We dropped to the Heights Receiving Towers twenty minutes ahead of time, and there hung at ease till the Yokohama Intermediate Packet could pull out and give us our proper slip.
Your clerks have forgotten the rag; the letter is not in the packet."
"You are an insolent fellow, and you have not looked," cried Mazarin, very angrily, "begone and wait my pleasure." Whilst saying these words, with perfectly Italian subtlety he snatched the packet from the hands of Colbert, and re-entered his apartments.
He had delivered a mel- ancholy oration previous to his funeral, and had doubtless in the packet of letters, presented vari- ous keepsakes to relatives.
He loosened two buttons of his coat, thrust in his hand, and brought forth the packet. As he ex- tended it to his friend the latter's face was turned from him.
He had been slow in the act of producing the packet because during it he had been trying to invent a remarkable comment upon the affair.
Do you see this packet? It contains a hundred thousand roubles.
No sooner did a tongue of flame burst out than she threw the packet of notes upon it.
He could not take his eyes off the smouldering packet.
He could not take his eyes off the smouldering packet; but it appeared that something new had come to birth in his soul--as though he were vowing to himself that he would bear this trial.
The fire, choked between a couple of smouldering pieces of wood, had died down for the first few moments after the packet was thrown upon it.
The packet had been wrapped in a threefold covering of newspaper, and the, notes were safe.
"It's all his--the whole packet is for him, do you hear--all of you?" cried Nastasia Philipovna, placing the packet by the side of Gania.
Pierre took the packet. Prince Andrew, as if trying to remember whether he had something more to say, or waiting to see if Pierre would say anything, looked fixedly at him.