plus

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Related to PLUSS: Jabong

on the plus side

Considering the positive, beneficial, advantageous, etc., aspects of a situation, especially one that is or would be otherwise negative, detrimental, or disadvantageous. My wife went into labor while we were still away in Europe. The whole ordeal was really stressful, but on the plus side, our son now has EU citizenship!
See also: on, plus, side

plus ça change (plus c'est la même chose)

From French, meaning "the more things change, the more they remain the same." In English, the phrase is used in reference to situations or problems that remain the same, even when people or things involved in them are different. We move into a fancy new office, and still, the server crashes all the time. Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose. Plus ça change, eh? Even with Mr 'Give Back to the Working Class' in office, it's still the wealthy elite getting all the tax breaks.
See also: ca, change, la, meme, plus

plus-minus

more or less; roughly. South African
1992 Weekend Post He expected ‘plus-minus’ 1000 files would eventually be forwarded for ‘possible prosecution’.

plus or ˈminus

used when the number mentioned may actually be more or less by a particular amount: The margin of error was plus or minus three percentage points.
See also: minus, plus

plus ça ˈchange (, plus c’est la même ˈchose)

/%plu: s& "SQ~nZ; American English "SO:~Z/ (from French, saying) some things never really change, even though details such as time and people involved may be different: Despite assurances that this year’s competition would welcome new talent and new ideas, none of the newcomers have reached the final round. Plus ça change...
The meaning of the full expression in French is ‘the more it changes, the more it stays the same’.
See also: ca, change, plus

have your ˈgood, ˈplus, etc. points

have some good qualities or aspects: Europe has its good points, but I prefer the American way of life.She often seems rather unfriendly, but I suppose she’s got her plus points.
See also: have, point

ne plus ultra

The highest point of excellence, acme. Loosely translated from the Latin for “there is no reason to go further,” the phrase is a synonym of “zenith.” A new car with all the most modern features that any buyer could wish for (or so the manufacturer claims) might be touted as the ne plus ultra of automobiles. Legend has it that “ne plus ultra”—in its literal sense—was inscribed on Gibraltar's Pillars of Hercules as a warning to mariners not to venture, depending on the direction in which they were sailing, into the Atlantic Ocean or the Mediterranean Sea.
See also: Ne, plus